pack them in

pack in

1. To pack something into a container or enclosed space of some kind so that it may be stored or carried for future use. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pack" and "in." I packed in an extra chocolate bar as a treat for your lunch today. I'm packing my maternity clothes in a box in the attic we decide to have another baby sometime in the future. I'm sorry, I already packed the toothpaste in the suitcase for our trip. Isn't there another tube somewhere?
2. To manage to fit a lot of people or things into some enclosed space. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pack" and "in." Wow, they really pack the garlic in this dish, huh? Managers of the club have been accused of packing in people beyond its safety limits.
3. To manage to schedule a lot of activities into a limited amount of time. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pack" and "in." You sure packed in a lot in just a week! I've stopped trying to pack so many things to do in every time I travel because I end up not enjoying the location itself.
4. To surround something snugly within some substance or material. A noun or pronoun is used between "pack" and "in." We'll have to pack the finger in ice if we want to have any chance of reattaching it. They packed the stereo equipment in foam to ensure it wasn't damaged during delivery.
5. To quit or give up something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pack" and "in." I'm so glad you packed in the smoking—I wouldn't have been able to bear it if you had fallen ill from it. Tom packed his job in and moved to the countryside to work on his father's farm.
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pack them in

To bring or draw in a large number of people as an audience. Let's move to a bigger venue. That way, we'll really be able to pack them in! We need a big act to pack them in.
See also: pack

pack them in

Fig. to draw a lot of people. It was a good night at the theater. The play really packed them in. The circus manager knew he could pack them in if he advertised the lion tamer.
See also: pack

pack them in

Attract a large audience, as in A big star will always pack them in. This idiom alludes to tightly filling a hall. [c. 1940]
See also: pack

ˌpack them ˈin

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ˌpack the ˈhouse

attract a large audience; fill a theatre, hall, etc: This group’s been playing for twenty years but they’re still packing them in.The city orchestra always plays to a packed house.
See also: pack
References in periodicals archive ?
Heyes has enjoyed his fair share of big-race success down the years, relishing nights like Pack Them In's 2001 Laurels triumph, made all the more sweeter as he is a proud Mancunian and delights in winning at The Zoo.
Steamboat Lass resulted from a repeat mating which firstly came up with the 2001 Laurels winner Pack Them In. Nothing of his class figured among the second batch, which contained the Henlow puppy open winner Return On Time, but the exercise has now proved well worth while.
Further details regarding Supa Score, a 29.69sec Limerick winner, and her dam, the former A1 Hall Green grader Supatheme, appeared here on November 1, 2001, in connection with Pack Them In's Laurels victory.
Fourteen years on, a much different scenario surrounds the victory of Flashy Sir's great-grandson Pack Them In in the same Classic.
Whereas Flashy Sir's task in the 1987 final was simplified when the pacemaker Signal Spark went lame and veered very wide as he turned for home, there were no ifs or buts about Pack Them In's emphatic victory at Belle Vue last week.
Pack Them In was bred in Cappawhite, Co Tipperary, by Helen Kelly, who acquired his granddam Supatheme for breeding at the termination of her racing career at Hall Green.
Local lad Andy Heyes, trainer of Laurels winner Pack Them In, was yesterday still revelling in the glory of landing the Classic in front of his home crowd, writes Peter Meldrum.
I've only had Pack Them In a few months, but he came in great shape from Davie Laird and, other than take a little bit of weight off him, there has not been much else to it.
Heyes added: "Pack Them In's over three years old now and will be almost four come next year's Derby, which rules out that.
IT is easy to understand why many punters will be prepared to overlook Pack Them In's draw in four in the final of the William Hill Laurels over 465m at Belle Vue tonight (9.45pm, live on Sky Sports) as Andy Heyes's dog is clearly the time and form choice, but I am never a backer of the bang railer when he is that far from the fence.
As outlined before, it is not going to be Pack Them In, so Codology is the dog who earns the vote-the two times he has gone down to the favourite in the competition, Barrie Draper's dog has been drawn outside him and now he is two boxes inside.
Had Pack Them In drawn trap one for tonight's William Hill Laurels final at Belle Vue, we would be looking at a solid even-money favourite for the Classic, live from Belle Vue on Sky Sports 2.
In taking the view that Pack Them In's berth lessens his chance by 12 per cent, the Tote have looked at his overall performance from the `coffin box'-one win from six outings.
Mullins (D) can also strike with Killahora Conor in the 750m open, while other Romford fancies are Sandra and Pack Them In.
Sandra is clearly on good terms with herself just now and is the suggestion for those who must play in the staying hurdles, while the draw in one could hardly speak louder in Pack Them In's favour in the 400m open at 7.51pm.