pack off


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pack (someone or something) off to (some place)

To send someone or something to a certain location, often (of a person) abruptly, hastily, or unceremoniously. The kids were starting to drive us crazy, so we packed them off to a summer camp for a few weeks. We're excited to announce that we'll be packing the first copies of the book off to stores tomorrow!
See also: off, pack

pack someone off (to someone or something)

to send someone away to someone or some place. Laura just packed all the kids off to summer camp. She packed off the kids to their camp. After a lot of planning and a few tears, she packed them all off.
See also: off, pack

pack something off (to someone or something)

to send something to someone or something. I will pack the books off to you immediately. She packed off the books to my home address. Harry found the books I wanted and packed them off.
See also: off, pack

pack off

Also, pack someone or something off . Send someone (or something) away unceremoniously, as in As soon as the children are packed off to bed, I'll call you back, or She told Anne she'd pack her things off as soon as she had a chance. [First half of 1700s]
See also: off, pack

pack off

v.
To send someone away to some place, especially in a hurry or without his or her consent: The neighbors packed their children off to boarding school. When I went on vacation, I packed off the dogs to the kennel before leaving.
See also: off, pack
References in periodicals archive ?
Then we realised that wouldn't be a good idea as a pet like my dog Darcy would be tearing the pack off all the time.
Within the hollow body is a pack off rubber with a passage formed along its longitudinal axis for passage of a data transmitting wireline.
But Jenkins - a loose-head who coach Steve Hansen is trying to convert into a tight-head - said: "I've heard some of the big names of the 1970s slagging the Welsh pack off, but it's a different game now.
We had an ice pack on Bob Brunet's shoulder, and Chris Hanburger went up to him and said, `Brunet, I need that water more than you do,' and he grabbed the ice pack off his shoulder and drank the ice water out of the bag.
In 1893 Nansen initiated a plan to trace the polar current by allowing a specially built ship to freeze into the ice pack off eastern Siberia and to be carried across the Arctic Ocean to Spitsbergen by the currents.