pack a wallop

pack a wallop

1. To be able to punch very powerfully. For such a scrawny kid, George sure can pack a wallop—even the older kids are afraid of him!
2. By extension, to have a powerful effect or impact. I don't like spicy food, so I hope this salsa doesn't pack a wallop.
See also: pack, wallop

pack a wallop

 and pack a punch
Fig. to provide a burst of energy, power, or excitement. Wow, this spicy food really packs a wallop. I put a special kind of gasoline in my car because I thought it would pack a punch. It didn't.
See also: pack, wallop

pack a wallop/punch, to

To exert formidable power. In modern English to wallop means to thrash, and in noun form, a heavy blow, but originally the verb meant to boil with a noisy, bubbling sound, and the noun also was slang for ale. Glyndebourne, site of a summer opera festival in England, perpetuates the last meaning in the name of its restaurant, Nether Wallop (Lower Ale). The verb pack in this expression means “to deliver.” The term dates from the early twentieth century. Eugene O’Neill used it literally in his play The Hairy Ape (1922): “He packa da wallop, I tella you.” Figuratively it appears in such locutions as, “The candidate’s speech really packed a punch.”
See also: pack, wallop
References in periodicals archive ?
Looking for Vaccines That Pack a Wallop Without the Side Effects," http://www.
Made from chickpeas (garbanzo beans), sesame seeds, lemon, and garlic, they pack a wallop of protein and will help keep you energized all afternoon.
Patrick Goda, then at Los Alamos, had revealed that an asteroid slamming into the ocean can pack a wallop.