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pace (oneself)

To move or progress at a speed and rate that one is able to sustain until the act is completed. Pace yourself—if you start sprinting right at the beginning of the race, you'll run out of energy well before the finish line!
See also: pace

pace (something) off

To take even strides as a means of counting and marking a particular distance or measuring the distance of something. He paced off the perimeter of his property and determined it was roughly 80 meters in length. The two stood back to back and paced ten yards off in opposite directions.
See also: off, pace
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

pace something

 out
1. Lit. to measure a distance by counting the number of even strides taken while walking. He paced the distance out and wrote it down. He paced out the distance from the door to the mailbox.
2. Fig. to deal with a problem by pacing around. When she was upset, she walked and walked while she thought through her problem. When Ed came into the room, she was pacing a new crisis out. She usually paced out her anxiety.

pace something

off to mark off a distance by counting the number of even strides taken while walking. The farmer paced a few yards off and pounded a stake into the soil. He paced off a few yards.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pace (oneself)

To move or make progress at a sensible or moderate rate.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to the organisation's sports programmes, PACES operate parallel schemes that tackle issues such as hygiene, nutrition, children's rights and protection of the environment.
International events--such as the recent football tournament in Norway that saw the PACES team take first prize--have seen hundreds of young Palestinian boys and girls represent their country in competitive team sports, thanks to the good offices of PACES.
PACES has no plans to restrict its influence or its reach at this stage.
etc.) and your injury (type and location of pain), training schedule (typical weekly workouts, pace, surface).
You can try out your learned internal sense of pace on your course, checking against the watch to learn how to adjust for the hills and valleys of real terrain.
The most important pace for building distance endurance is the lactate threshold pace, also called the "tempo" pace.
Everybody has a maximum pace that they can keep up over the bulk of a race.
By having a control group who performed the self-paced run twice, it enabled us to examine the possible effects of learning to pace the run, and also examine whether following a pacer would lead to greater improvements in performance than repeating a self-paced run.
Both pacesetter and participants were allowed to wear their own watches to help pace themselves.
Participants were instructed to request the pace they would like the pacer to run at (e.g., run at their mean pace from the first trial for each lap).
Results suggest that both groups learned to pace the distance more effectively for the second trial.
It is quite possible that the perceived lack of autonomy regarding pace selection is why they felt more anxious before the paced trial, and likely to be exacerbated if they had no prior experience of running with a pacer.
In short, the potential benefits of following a pacer might require experience of following one, which may in turn enhance confidence in one's physiological and psychological resources for maintaining pace.
In terms of how a pacing strategy affected performance specifically, results show that the self-paced group changed their pacing strategy between trials, opting for a faster start (i.e., Lap 1 and 2), which resulted in a significant decrease in pace between Lap 2-3 during their second trial.
The pace of the recovery will be uneven, varying by region of the country (slower in the Midwest), market, submarket and building class.