pace


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pace something

 out
1. Lit. to measure a distance by counting the number of even strides taken while walking. He paced the distance out and wrote it down. He paced out the distance from the door to the mailbox.
2. Fig. to deal with a problem by pacing around. When she was upset, she walked and walked while she thought through her problem. When Ed came into the room, she was pacing a new crisis out. She usually paced out her anxiety.

pace something

off to mark off a distance by counting the number of even strides taken while walking. The farmer paced a few yards off and pounded a stake into the soil. He paced off a few yards.

pace (oneself)

To move or make progress at a sensible or moderate rate.
See:
References in classic literature ?
Nearer and nearer came the two birds, all absorbed in their own contest, the stork wheeling upwards, the hawk still fluttering above it, until they were not a hundred paces from the camp.
We shall hear anon," said Johnston quietly, and presently a young archer came running to say that the arrow had fallen twenty paces beyond the fourth wand.
She quickened her pace and rose smoothly, just as he had fancied she would, and as she left the ground gave herself up to the force of her rush, which carried her far beyond the ditch; and with the same rhythm, without effort, with the same leg forward, Frou-Frou fell back into her pace again.
It was only from feeling himself nearer the ground and from the peculiar smoothness of his motion that Vronsky knew how greatly the mare had quickened her pace.
Two blocks from the laundry, where an arc-light showed a gang of toughs on the corner, Saxon quickened her pace.
They cantered forward at as brisk a pace as Joe's charger could attain, and presently stopped in the little copse where he had left her in the morning.
Oliver, who could hardly stand, made a shift to raise himself on his feet, and was at once lugged along the streets by the jacket-collar, at a rapid pace.
Oliver walked a few paces after them; and, not knowing whether to advance or retire, stood looking on in silent amazement.
But there is no stopping then, for the old gentleman speaks stoutly to him, the horses mend their pace, and they are already at the garden-gate.
In that place (which is the next room) there are decanters of wine, and all that sort of thing, set out as grand as if Kit and his friends were first-rate company; and there is little Jacob, walking, as the popular phrase is, into a home-made plum-cake, at a most surprising pace, and keeping his eye on the figs and oranges which are to follow, and making the best use of his time, you may believe.
At a hundred paces from the gates of Calais, D'Artagnan's horse gave out, and could not by any means be made to get up again, the blood flowing from his eyes and his nose.
When any young man came within a hundred paces of her castle, he became quite fixed, and could not move a step till she came and set him free; which she would not do till he had given her his word never to come there again: but when any pretty maiden came within that space she was changed into a bird, and the fairy put her into a cage, and hung her up in a chamber in the castle.
In revolving these matters, while she undressed, it suddenly struck her as not unlikely that she might that morning have passed near the very spot of this unfortunate woman's confinement -- might have been within a few paces of the cell in which she languished out her days; for what part of the abbey could be more fitted for the purpose than that which yet bore the traces of monastic division?
Their chief is a hundred paces ahead of them and they are rushing after him at headlong speed.
In the meantime the lion had approached with quiet dignity to within ten paces of the two men, where he stood curiously watching them.