overshare


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overshare

1. verb To disclose too much information, typically that which is related to one's personal life and which would makes the recipient uncomfortable or which the recipient would prefer not to know. Please try not to overshare when the boss is around, OK? He doesn't need to know what the itch cream is for. Oh yes, Janet always overshares. Like, who cares that her fourth hamster died—she's just going to go out and get another one anyway!
2. noun Such a disclosure. Please steer clear of overshares when the boss is around, OK? He doesn't need to know what the itch cream is for. Oh yes, you can always count on an overshare from Janet. Like, who cares that her fourth hamster died—she's just going to go out and get another one anyway!
References in periodicals archive ?
The 22 year old believes her people skills are her biggest strength, although feels her openness and willingness to overshare can sometimes work against her.
Adds Small, Remember, dont click, dont overshare and keep your personal information private.
You can't turn a virtual corner on social media without bumping into an attention-seeking celebrity, keen to overshare their trials and tribulations and secrets to success - usually just before the release of their latest hot new meal ticket.
According to Ziccarelli, many individuals feel much more comfortable --and thus are more likely to overshare or speak freely--using emojis via certain platforms, particularly text or IM, compared to more formal communication methods like email.
Don't overshare about your drinking and drugging days.
For instance, a recent special issue of Social Media & Society highlighted some of the emergent provocations facing future industries in which parents overshare images of infants (Leaver, 2017).
She plays her cards close to the vest, at a time when the world welcomes leaders who if anything overshare, but also understand how to communicate with a 24-hour, networked public.
Study Finds Older Adults More Likely to Overshare Than Younger People
Beware the dreaded overshare. Veterinary Team Brief, 10-12.
"Our societal craving for privacy is the catalyst to being tracked by technology, overworked and pressured to overshare via social media.
Sometimes I overshare (pretty much like I've done here) and overexplain because I want to make sure things come out as intended.
Do not overshare on social media and other websites as criminals use personal information such as birthdays, addresses and phone numbers to hack into accounts;
"Study: People Who Overshare on Facebook Just Want to Belong." The Atlantic, 16 June 2014, www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/06/study-people-who-overshare-on-facebook-just-want-to-belong/372834/.
(Example: You probably don't have to tell perfect strangers about the time you had a stomach bug or about everything you ate for breakfast this morning.) So when you sense you're starting to overshare, try taking a step back and letting other people talk.
Contrary to the stereotypes, this tendency to "overshare" isn't just about self-involvement or grandstanding.