outstay your welcome

outstay (one's) welcome

1. To remain a guest in a place, especially someone's home, for too long, to the point where the host no longer wishes one to stay. After the cool reception I received at breakfast, it was apparent that I had outstayed my welcome at the cottage of my father's friend.
2. By extension, to have one's presence become unwanted in a particular environment. The polls make it clear that this candidate has outstayed her welcome in this primary race. Though wildly popular for a short time, the product simply outstayed its welcome in the market, and can now be found in bargain bins everywhere.
See also: outstay, welcome

outstay your welcome

stay as a visitor longer than you are wanted.
See also: outstay, welcome

outstay/overstay your ˈwelcome

(of a guest) stay too long so that you are no longer welcome: We visited some friends in France, but we didn’t want to overstay our welcome and left after a couple of days.
References in periodicals archive ?
But O'Neill added: "I just feel that if you're going to end up signing something that you should feel you deserve it "Sometimes you don't want to outstay your welcome."
Sir Terry, who presented the Radio 2 Breakfast Show for 27 years until he hung up his headphones in 2009, admitted he missed his old show, but said it was best not to "outstay your welcome".
Sky Movies Comedy, 9.45pm One of the rules of a great comedy is never outstay your welcome. It's a key reason this spin-off from the Police Squad series was so endearing, clocking in at under the 90-minute mark.
While most of his costars said they would love to appear in another movie, Stewart said all good things must come to an end and ``you never want to outstay your welcome''.that Star Trek: Nemesis could well be his swan song as Captain JeanLuc Picard.
"There comes a time when you outstay your welcome and people think you have been there a bit too long.
I doubt, however, the new boyfriend is your biggest fan and if you're sensible you won't outstay your welcome.