out

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Related to outs: outside, outlook, ours, OTS
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starve (someone or something) out

To deprive someone or something of food in order to force them to submit or surrender. The terrorists have indicated that they will not leave the building peacefully, so police are planning to simply starve them out. The empire's army began starving the rebel city out, its siege lasting nearly three months.
See also: out, starve

*out (in blossom)

 and *out (in bloom)
[of a plant or tree] blooming; [of flowers] open in blooms. (*Typically: be ~; come ~.) All the trees were out in blossom. The daffodils won't be out until next week.

*out

 (from under someone or something)
1. Lit. out from beneath someone or something. (*Typically: be ~; get ~; crawl ~; creep ~; move ~.) Will you please get out from under my bed? The dog got out from under her just before she sat down.
2. Fig. free of someone's control or the burden of a problem. (*Typically: be ~; get ~; crawl ~; move ~.) Mary wanted to get out from under her mother. There is so much work to do! I don't know when I'll ever get out from under it.

*out

 (of something)
1. gone; having left some place; absent froma place; escaped. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) The monkey is out of its cage. Sam is out of the building at present.
2. having no more of something. (*Typically: be ~; run ~.) Sorry, we are fresh out of cucumbers. We ran out of catsup and mustard halfway through the picnic.
3. free of the responsibility of doing something. (*Typically: get ~.) Are you trying to get out of this job? You agreed to do it, and you can't get out of it!

*out

an excuse; means of avoiding something. (*Typically: have ~; give someone ~.) He's very clever. No matter what happens, he always has an out.

out (on strike)

to be away from one's job in a strike or protest. The workers went out on strike. We can't do anything while the workers are out.

out

1. mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. (Probably from far out.) Those guys are really out!
2. mod. out of fashion. (The opposite of in.) That kind of clothing is strictly out.
3. tv. to make someone’s homosexuality public. (Can be reflexive.) He outed himself at the party last Friday.
See:
References in classic literature ?
My wife had always been a woman of a frank, open nature, and it gave me a chill to see her slinking into her own room, and crying out and wincing when her own husband spoke to her.
I really think that I should have fainted if I had not gone out.
We hardly exchanged a word during breakfast, and immediately afterwards I went out for a walk, that I might think the matter out in the fresh morning air.
It happened that my way took me past the cottage, and I stopped for an instant to look at the windows, and to see if I could catch a glimpse of the strange face which had looked out at me on the day before.
As we went I glanced back, and there was that yellow livid face watching us out of the upper window.
He poured out an incoherent story of love and penitence.
Because I'm going out with that gentleman I told you about tonight.
His eyes were rather moist and glittered more than usual, and as he sat in his saddle, wrapped up in his fur coat, he looked like a child taken out for an outing.
How he chased a fox out of the rank grass by the Zavarzinsk thicket the other day
The other day when he came out from Mass in full uniform, Michael Sidorych.
The count, forgetting to smooth out the smile on his face, looked into the distance straight before him, down the narrow open space, holding the snuffbox in his hand but not taking any.
cried Simon to a borzoi that was pushing forward out of the wood.
They spoke to him briefly and softly, and conducted him out through the same door at the rear.
Demps Donovan picked a scrap with your Lizzie-boy, and they've waltzed out to the slaughter room with him.
Chuck that cheese slicer out of the window," he said, "and tell 'em inside that Mr.