grow out of

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grow out of (something)

1. Literally, to emerge from a particular area or container, as of a plant. I can't believe that flowers are growing out of that rocky soil.
2. To no longer do something because one has aged or matured. I thought she would have grown out of temper tantrums by now.
3. To no longer be able to fit into an article of clothing because one has grown taller or gained weight. This phrase is often applied to children. The baby has already grown out of her infant onesies.
4. To emerge from something. My novel grew out of a short story I'd written as a kid. Can you believe their fistfight grew out of a tense exchange in the check-out line?
See also: grow, of, out

grow out of something

 
1. Lit. to develop and grow outward from something. Soft green shoots grew out of the trunk of the tree. A bush grew out of the gutter and hung down the front of the house.
2. Lit. to age out of something; to outgrow something; to abandon something as one matures. Finally, Ted grew out of his bedwetting. Haven't you grown out of your fear of the dark yet?
3. Lit. to grow so much that some article of clothing does not fit. Timmy's getting so tall that he's grown out of all his clothes. He grew out of his suit, and he's only worn it three times.
4. Fig. [for a problem] to develop from something less serious. This whole matter grew out of your failure to let the cat out last night. A big argument has grown out of a tiny disagreement!
See also: grow, of, out

grow out of

1. Develop or come into existence from. For example, This article grew out of a few scribbled notes, or Their mutual trust grew out of long acquaintance.
2. Also, outgrow. Become too large or mature for, as in The baby's grown out of all her dresses, or He will outgrow these picture books in a few months.
See also: grow, of, out

grow out of

To develop or come into existence from: an article that grew out of a few scribbled notes.
See also: grow, of, out
References in periodicals archive ?
In short, many factors are involved in determining when a child may outgrow his or her allergy.
Children with more severe symptoms were less likely to outgrow the disease.
4) When children outgrow their booster seats, (usually about age 8 or when they are at least 4'9" tall) they can use the adult seat belt in the back seat, if it fits properly.
We saw kids whose eczema got a lot better who stayed allergic, and other kids whose eczema stayed severe who managed to outgrow their allergies," Dr.
Concerned about the possibility of recurrence in patients who outgrow the allergy then start eating peanuts, Dr.
Dr Robert Wood, a paediatric allergy specialist at Johns Hopkins Children's Center in the US, who carried out the study, said, ``Although we once thought peanut allergy was a lifelong problem, we now believe certain children may outgrow it.
It may make sense, however, for patients who outgrow peanut allergy to keep epinephrine on hand for the first year or two of eating peanuts, or indefinitely if they eat too few peanuts to judge their tolerance.
Crabs periodically shed their hard outer skins as they grow, much as children constantly outgrow their clothes.
The firm noted that it plans to outgrow the PC-chip market in 2007 by twice the average growth rate.
Now a team in the US has suggested that youngsters who outgrow their peanut allergy should eat concentrated forms of peanut products, such as peanut butter, at least once a month to maintain tolerance.
SEATTLE -- If you treat asthmatic children, chances are parents have asked you if their child will outgrow the condition.
Now, a new study suggests that while most children outgrow early wheezing, a significant proportion face a high risk of developing asthma.
I think the older kids oftentimes outgrow the traditional camp sooner,'' he said.
Boys will outgrow cowboy decor (except maybe those who grow up to buy 200-acre Montana ranches) sooner than they will sports, cars, aircraft and boats.
Children can outgrow their asthma, and the condition, for all its prevalence, is highly treatable, though there is no cure.