out-of-pocket


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Related to out-of-pocket: Out-of-pocket expenses

out of pocket

1. Lacking the adequate amount of money; poor or impoverished; having suffered a financial loss. Hyphenated is used before a noun. I get paid next week, so can we go out to dinner then? I'm just a bit out of pocket right now. The CEO drained the company's accounts and fled the country with the money, leaving behind out-of-pocket clients and investors.
2. Paid for with one's own, personal money. Hyphenated is used before a noun. The company is making me pay for all this equipment out of pocket! You'll have to pay for the plane tickets out of pocket, but you'll be reimbursed after you arrive. The out-of-pocket costs for these medical examinations are really straining my bank account. I hope my insurance reimburses me for some of them.
3. Unavailable; away from one's desk or phone; not able to be contacted. Janet is out of pocket right now, but I can give her a message.
See also: of, out, pocket

out-of-pocket

COMMON Out-of-pocket expenses are costs connected with work that people pay themselves at first but are usually paid back to them later. I charge twenty dollars an hour plus out-of-pocket expenses. Note: If you pay out of pocket, you pay for something yourself and claim the money back later. As long as people have to pay out of pocket to see a physician, many people will not get the necessary care.
References in periodicals archive ?
Out-of-pocket financing of health care is the principle source of healthcare financing in most developing economies and India is no exception to this trend.
Employers offering HDHPs can help employees fund out-of-pocket expenses through health savings accounts and supplemental health benefits, but there's still room for improvement," he says.
4 percent, of the 34,448 plans available this year as bargains in terms both of premiums and of annual out-of-pocket spending maximums.
However, globally, in both years, substantial numbers of Americans spent billions of dollars out-of-pocket on these approaches, an indication that users believe enough in the value of these approaches to pay for them.
While most people will not pay Medicare Part A premiums, a recent Health View services report estimates a 55-year-old couple, retiring in 10 years, needing more than $450,000 to cover Medicare Parts B & D, dental, vision and other out-of-pocket costs through their life expectancy.
Major finding: Under the ACA, the average, per claim, out-of-pocket cost for oral contraceptives dropped from $33.
A 2013 Sun Life Financial survey pegs average out-of-pocket costs for a critical illness at $7,500.
Chronically ill people are likely to be underinsured and face extremely high out-of-pocket costs,'' said Caroline Pearson, who tracks the health care overhaul for Avalere Health, a market research and consulting firm.
Deciding on a metal level is the first step in understanding which plan may be right for you You also will want to understand how your plan's benefits are designed so that you strike the balance between coverage that meets your health care needs and the amount you are willing to pay in premiums and out-of-pocket costs All plans within a single metal level are not the same, and depending on your particular health needs and the prescription medications you take, the amount you pay out-of-pocket each year could vary significantly within the same metal level See the Key Components of Plan Selection section for a guide to choosing among plans in a given level of coverage.
Out-of-pocket spending rose more quickly than expenditures per person in 2012, increasing 4.
Most consumers who get new insurance under the Affordable Care Act should see their out-of-pocket spending for medical care fall, according to a RAND Corp.
And as employer-provided health care benefits continue to evolve for a growing number of Americans, you might be able to add out-of-pocket health care costs to the list, too.
But the report also found consumers continued to pay more out-of-pocket for substance use admissions than for other types of hospital admissions.
Yet consumers continued to pay more out-of-pocket for substance-use admissions than for other types of hospital admissions, according to a new Health Care Cost Institute (HCCI) report.
Those at public 4-year institutions had an average total price of $18,900, those at for-profit institutions had an average total price of $28,600, and those at private non-profit 4-year institutions had the highest average total price ($35,500); (3) After all financial aid is received (including grants, loans, and work-study), the average out-of-pocket net price ranged from $9,100 at public 2-year institutions to $10,300 at public 4-year institutions, $16,000 at for-profit institutions, and $16,600 at private nonprofit 4-year institutions; (4) Along with income, a student's total price of attendance is also a factor in determining eligibility for financial aid.