out-of-pocket


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Related to out-of-pocket: Out-of-pocket expenses

out of pocket

1. Of something paid for, with one's own, personal money. Hyphenated if used before a noun. The company is making me pay for all this equipment out of pocket! You'll have to pay for the plane tickets out of pocket, but you'll be reimbursed after you arrive. The out-of-pocket costs for these medical examinations are really straining my bank account. I hope my insurance reimburses me for some of them.
2. Lacking the adequate amount of money; poor or impoverished; having suffered a financial loss. Hyphenated if used before a noun. I get paid next week, so can we go out to dinner then? I'm just a bit out of pocket right now. The CEO drained the company's accounts and fled the country with the money, leaving behind out-of-pocket clients and investors.
3. Unavailable; away from one's desk or phone; not able to be contacted. Janet is out of pocket right now, but I can give her a message.
See also: of, out, pocket

out-of-pocket

COMMON Out-of-pocket expenses are costs connected with work that people pay themselves at first but are usually paid back to them later. I charge twenty dollars an hour plus out-of-pocket expenses. Note: If you pay out of pocket, you pay for something yourself and claim the money back later. As long as people have to pay out of pocket to see a physician, many people will not get the necessary care.
References in periodicals archive ?
Damme WV, Leemput LV, Hardeman W, Meessen B (2004) Out-of-pocket health expenditure and debt in poor households: evidence from Cambodia.
Such out-of-pocket costs could affect patients' survival in various ways, according to Goulart: They might stop taking their TKI, or they might have a hard time affording their basic needs, for example.
Improvements in out-of-pocket spending and income measures could partially offset each other in the estimated burden calculation overall, but there may be different implications for subgroups, such as the privately or publicly insured.
Advancing the policies outlined above will help lower out-of-pocket costs, enable patients to make more informed healthcare decisions, provide stability to the Medicare program, and end payment disparities that have led to consolidation across the healthcare marketplace.
In adjusted analyses, mean annual out-of-pocket spending was $1,000 (CI = $886-$1,113) for cancer survivors and $622 (CI = $606-$639) for persons without a cancer history (p<0.001) (Table 2).
Shelley Moore Capita (R., W.Va.) and Jon Tester (D., Mt.), and signed by 29 senators, the letter states: "We believe the policy outlined in the proposed rule would provide needed relief from the impact pharmacy DIR fees have had on patients' out-of-pocket costs and community pharmacies." The senators point to the staggering increase in DIR fees for pharmacies participating in the Part D program, which have swollen by "more than 45,000% between 2010 and 2017."
PSA data showed household out-of-pocket expenses reached P372.8 billion in 2017.
The bulk of health expenditures came from households as seen in the 54.5 percent share of household out-of-pocket expenses to the total health expenditures.
The average out-of-pocket cost for enrollees with low-income subsidies, on the other hand, dropped by 20% in 2011--from $1,858 to $1,485, Kaiser reported.
About 81% of Medicare fee-for-service enrollees now use some kind of public or private arrangement to cap their maximum out-of-pocket spending, and to cope with ordinary deductible, co-payment and coinsurance bills, according to GAO analysts.
But insurers are compensating for efforts to hold premiums to eyeball-catching levels by raising the enrollees' amount of "skin in the game," or out-of-pocket spending.
This amount represents 9.2% of all out-of-pocket spending by Americans on health care and 1.1% of total health care spending.
This amount represents 9.2% of all out-of-pocket spending by Americans on healthcare and 1.1% of total healthcare spending.
Health insurance deductibles and out-of-pocket costs have skyrocketed under the ACA, leaving employees to pick up more and more of their health care costs.
Women have seen a 20% decrease in their out-of-pocket expenses for oral contraceptives and intrauterine devices since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act's mandate to cover contraceptives without consumer cost sharing, according to a new analysis published in Health Affairs.