out of the window

out of the window

Discarded, tossed out. This term is often used in the phrase go out the window, as in For the town planners past experience seems to have gone out the window. It alludes to unwanted items being hurled out of the window. [First half of 1900s]
See also: of, out, window
References in classic literature ?
Poyser in a hard voice, rolling and unrolling her knitting and looking icily out of the window, as she continued to stand opposite the squire.
You first," he says, and flings the cage out of the window.
shouted Pierre, banging the table with a determined and drunken gesture and preparing to climb out of the window.
At the sight of another human being my torpor passed, and I leaned out of the window eagerly.
Well, the truth is, it isn't the scene of his crime, said Fisher, and went and looked out of the window.
I only waited to put the matches near the candle before I extinguished it, and groped my way back into the sitting-room, I locked that door, as I had locked my bedroom door--then quietly got out of the window, and cautiously set my feet on the leaden roof of the verandah.
She sat and looked out of the window, curious to see something of the road over which she was being driven to the queer place Mrs.
Look out of the window in about ten minutes and you'll see," the woman answered.
Next morning the Sultan looked out of the window towards Aladdin's palace and rubbed his eyes, for it was gone.
As soon as I dared I ran up the winding stair, and looked out of the window, which opened South.
Caderousse, scarcely yet relying on this promise, put his legs out of the window and stood on the ladder.
Then Ridley, leaning on his elbow and looking out of the window, observed that it was a lovely night.
The boxes were very high, and the children knew that they must not creep over them; so they often obtained permission to get out of the windows to each other, and to sit on their little stools among the roses, where they could play delight fully.