out


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

out (some amount of money)

Having lost, wasted, or spent some amount of money; having some amount of money less at one's disposal. You little punk! I'm out nearly $500 in repairs because of what you did to my car! I'm very choosy about the movies I go see in the theater—if I'm going to be out 15 bucks, I'll be damn sure it's something I really want to see.
See also: amount, of, out

starve (someone or something) out

To deprive someone or something of food in order to force them to submit or surrender. The terrorists have indicated that they will not leave the building peacefully, so police are planning to simply starve them out. The empire's army began starving the rebel city out, its siege lasting nearly three months.
See also: out, starve

*out (in blossom)

 and *out (in bloom)
[of a plant or tree] blooming; [of flowers] open in blooms. (*Typically: be ~; come ~.) All the trees were out in blossom. The daffodils won't be out until next week.

*out

 (from under someone or something)
1. Lit. out from beneath someone or something. (*Typically: be ~; get ~; crawl ~; creep ~; move ~.) Will you please get out from under my bed? The dog got out from under her just before she sat down.
2. Fig. free of someone's control or the burden of a problem. (*Typically: be ~; get ~; crawl ~; move ~.) Mary wanted to get out from under her mother. There is so much work to do! I don't know when I'll ever get out from under it.

*out

 (of something)
1. gone; having left some place; absent froma place; escaped. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) The monkey is out of its cage. Sam is out of the building at present.
2. having no more of something. (*Typically: be ~; run ~.) Sorry, we are fresh out of cucumbers. We ran out of catsup and mustard halfway through the picnic.
3. free of the responsibility of doing something. (*Typically: get ~.) Are you trying to get out of this job? You agreed to do it, and you can't get out of it!

*out

an excuse; means of avoiding something. (*Typically: have ~; give someone ~.) He's very clever. No matter what happens, he always has an out.

out (on strike)

to be away from one's job in a strike or protest. The workers went out on strike. We can't do anything while the workers are out.

out

1. mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. (Probably from far out.) Those guys are really out!
2. mod. out of fashion. (The opposite of in.) That kind of clothing is strictly out.
3. tv. to make someone’s homosexuality public. (Can be reflexive.) He outed himself at the party last Friday.
See:
References in classic literature ?
I should have waited for the morning, but I could not sleep for excitement, and so at last I slipped out, knowing how difficult it is to awake you.
He lifted the little child, kissed her, and then, still carrying her, he held his other hand out to his wife and turned towards the door.
Holmes and I followed them down the lane, and my friend plucked at my sleeve as we came out.
As we went I glanced back, and there was that yellow livid face watching us out of the upper window.
We hardly exchanged a word during breakfast, and immediately afterwards I went out for a walk, that I might think the matter out in the fresh morning air.
It happened that my way took me past the cottage, and I stopped for an instant to look at the windows, and to see if I could catch a glimpse of the strange face which had looked out at me on the day before.
"For two days after this I stayed at home, and my wife appeared to abide loyally by our engagement, for, as far as I know, she never stirred out of the house.
"'I think that she has gone out for a walk,' she answered.
At last he outs into the passage, and he cries, 'Is that man never goin' to come?' Those were his very words, sir.
Chicago, IL, April 12, 2015 --(PR.com)-- Quik Clean Outs, a junk hauling company serving the greater Naperville area, is pleased to announce the launch of their new Web site and online advertising campaign.
An 'out' does not necessarily have to be a card that makes you a 'nut hand', although that certainly helps.
OUTS: Sam Rents (Crawley, free) Guy Butters (Havant, free).
"Karl Rove basically outed Valerie Plame, the undercover agent."
Call time out only when instructed from the sideline.