orient

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orient to (something)

1. To position someone, something, or oneself toward some point, landmark, direction, or location. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "orient" and "to." Growing up, I always new to orient myself to the mountains to the west if I needed to know a compass direction. The front of the house is oriented to the sunrise, so the back of the house always faces the sun when it sets.
2. To be positioned so as to be facing some point, landmark, direction, or location. The master bedroom is oriented to the sea, so you can see the water the moment you wake up. The mountain amphitheater is oriented to the southeast so that it looks over the town below it.
3. To familiarize someone, something, or oneself with some information or situation; to help someone, something, or oneself adjust or become acclimated to some new information or situation. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "orient" and "to." I'm going to have you shadow Martha for the first two weeks. She'll orient you to the way the office runs. I hate having to orient myself to a different operating system when I use someone else's computer.
4. To be or become familiar with, adjusted to, or acclimated to some new information or situation. Don't overload him with work until he has oriented to the new role.
See also: orient, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2022 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

orient someone to something

 
1. Lit. to help someone locate a compass direction or other similar location. Try to orient Karen to the light so I can photograph her. It took time, but I oriented myself to north at last.
2. Fig. to help someone adjust to something, a position, or a relationship. Will you please orient Bill to our routine? She found it difficult to orient herself to the new procedures.
See also: orient, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

orient to

v.
1. To position something or someone with respect to a point or system of reference: We oriented the telescope to the southern parts of the sky. The tent's opening is oriented to the sunlight.
2. To make someone familiar with something, as facts, principles, or a situation: I oriented the staff to the new computer system.
3. To become familiar with something, as facts, principles, or a situation: The rookie needs time to orient to the schedule.
4. To focus something on some topic or on the interests of some group: We should orient our meeting to any new problems that have arisen since last week. The afterschool program is oriented to elementary school students.
See also: orient, to
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"The materials don't like each other, so when oriented, they cavitate and become opaque," Coburn notes.
In addition, Trico is developing monolayer structures that orient at higher temperatures and with less shrinkage than coex films.
Blown film also starts with an inherent degree of biaxial orientation, so when strength is needed in an oriented film product, blown film may be the better choice.
Avery Dennison has four MDO lines making oriented label films in Painesville and Concord.
"If you MD orient sheet, you can put out a lot more pounds and eliminate the need to laminate films for stiffness," Williams adds.
For example, a processor wanting to orient in both directions would typically have to downsize the die.
The material is divided methodologically: the first chapter deals with traditional ways of conceptualising the world; the second with known interactions of the Welsh with the East; while the third looks at translated legendary Charlemagne material for its reflection of popular contemporary perceptions of the Orient.
She thereby ties translatio studii et imperii to her tripartite conception of the Orient, which she proposes as a means for understanding the medieval Western European view of the East.