ordain (one) as (something)

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ordain (one) as (something)

To invest one with the powers, duties, and responsibilities attendant upon a particular religious role. Often used in passive constructions. Regina Jones was ordained as the first female rabbi in 1935. I just heard the clergy ordained Tom as a priest.
See also: ordain

ordain someone

 (as) something
1. Lit. to establish someone as a priest or minister. In a lovely ceremony, they ordained David as a priest. He was ordained as a priest by a bishop.
2. Fig. to establish someone as something. They ordained the poor old man as a deputy sheriff. Was he duly ordained as a Mercedes mechanic?
References in periodicals archive ?
He was ordained as a deacon and a priest at once, under a special faculty from the Archbishop of Canterbury, Most Rev Justin Welby.
Alison Gwlachmai, Jon Price and Martin Pritchard will be ordained as deacons and Miriam Beecroft and Tania ap Sion will be ordained as priests.
"A lot of people will admit seeing women being ordained as a danger," Ditewig said.
Steve Hood, 52, who will be ordained as a Deacon, joked: "The main thing it means for me at the moment is that I'm missing the British Grand Prix, because that's the same day as the ceremony.
In the summer of 2003, two of the seven women priests, Christine Mayr-Lumetzberger and Gisela Forster, were ordained as bishops by several (male) bishops, who were different from the male bishops who ordained on the Danube.
Three women were ordained as Roman Catholic priests by Bishop Patricia Fresen of Germany at a ceremony in Toronto in May.
John's church in Glencoe, Ont., was among the first six women who were ordained as priests (women bad previously been ordained as deacons) in the Anglican Church of Canada on Nov.
In 1997 the denomination amended its constitution to stipulate that in order to be ordained as a church leader, a person must live in a committed heterosexual relationship or be chaste.
By contrast, the Cardinal sees the priesthood of the ordained as being more fundamentally related to the community; it is, in fact, an expression of the community.
Ditewig takes up the question of present possibilities, the theological and pastoral question: "Can and should women be ordained as deacons?"
The three women had been ordained as deacons in 2003--a decade after the diocesan council affirmed the decisions of the Lambeth Conference on women's ordination in 1988.
This organization and these publications made it their goal to seek out and destroy alleged liberalism in Southern Baptist life; among others, liberals included women ordained as deacons and the churches that ordained them.