orbit

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into orbit

1. Into a state of extreme agitation, panic, irritation, or anger. Few things send me into orbit like someone who doesn't use their turn signals on the road. I've always hated the dentist. Just hearing the little whirr of the drill is enough to put me into orbit!
2. Into a state of great happiness. Seeing the band perform put me into orbit from beginning to end.
3. Into an extreme increase, especially a successful one. The popular ad sent sales into orbit. People who've spent time in law enforcement know that crime goes into orbit in the summertime.
See also: orbit

in orbit

1. Traveling around a celestial body. The planets are in orbit around the sun, right?
2. Extremely happy. Penny's been in orbit since getting engaged last week. I don't think she's stopped smiling once!
3. Intoxicated or high. Do you remember last night at the bar at all? You were really in orbit!
See also: orbit

go into orbit

1. To begin to revolve around a celestial body, as of an object in outer space. Wow, it looks like that moon has gone into orbit.
2. To enter a state of extreme agitation, panic, irritation, or anger. Oh man, I just go into orbit when someone doesn't use their turn signals on the road. I've always hated the dentist. I go into orbit just hearing the little whirr of the drill!
3. To enter a state of great happiness. I totally went into orbit watching my favorite band perform live!
See also: go, orbit

go into orbit

 
1. Lit. [for a rocket, satellite, etc.] to rotate around a heavenly body in a fixed path. The satellite went into orbit just as planned. When did the moon go into orbit?
2. Fig. [for someone] to get very excited. (See also go ballistic.) She was so upset, she went into orbit. Todd went into orbit when he heard the price.
See also: go, orbit

*in orbit

 
1. Lit. [of something] circling a heavenly body. (*Typically: be ~; put something [into] ~.) The moon is in orbit around the earth. They put the satellite into orbit.
2. Fig. ecstatic; thrilled; emotionally high. (*Typically: be ~.) Jane is in orbit about her new job. John went into orbit when he got the check in the mail.
3. Inf. intoxicated. After having six drinks all to herself, Julie was in orbit.
See also: orbit

orbit (around) someone or something

to circle around something in an orbit. The flies orbited around Fred and his ice-cream cone. Many satellites orbit around our planet.

in orbit

Thrilled, delighted, as in Dean's in orbit over his son's success. This expression alludes to the successful launching into orbit of a satellite or other spacecraft. [Slang; late 1900s]
See also: orbit

into orbit

into a state of heightened activity, performance, anger, or excitement. informal
1988 Candia McWilliam A Case of Knives I am a greedy girl, not merely swayed but waltzed into orbit by appearances.
See also: orbit

go into orbit

in. to become very excited. The entire staff went into orbit when they got the news.
See also: go, orbit

in orbit

1. mod. ecstatic; euphoric. She was just in orbit when she got the letter.
2. mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. Gary is in orbit and can’t see a hole in a ladder.
See also: orbit
References in periodicals archive ?
This pushed the orbits of Uranus and Neptune so far outward that they barreled into the band of gas, dust, and ice.
Between collisions, neutrons move in orbits having constant angular momentum.
Just one month after launching Sputnik, the Soviets sent a dog named Laika into Earth orbit aboard Sputnik 2.
If that proves to be the case, as planet hunters refine their techniques and begin detecting planets in wider orbits about stars, they may be in for a bonanza of discoveries.
They swoop in and out of the plane in which the planets orbit the sun and have highly elongated, rather than circular, paths.
This extrasolar planet sets several records at once: the oldest, the most distant, the lowest metallicity, and the first one to orbit two stars," says Boss.
The black hole at the galaxy's center will ultimately disrupt this pas de deux, and in some cases, will capture the lighter star into an orbit about 25 times as large as that of Pluto, Gould and Quillen say.
The data hint that a third planet, about as massive as Saturn, may orbit 55 Cancri at a distance about half that at which Mercury orbits the sun.
However, their circular orbits increase the odds that an inner, Earthlike planet could also reside there, the astronomers calculate.