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all Lombard Street to a China orange

Very probable or likely. London's Lombard Street has long been associated with the banking industry, while a "China orange" is considered an ordinary, unimportant thing. We'll definitely be able to beat the worst team in the league—it's all Lombard Street to a China orange.
See also: all, china, orange, street, to

apples and oranges

Two unlike things or people. Oh, you can't compare those two companies, they're apples and oranges! My mom and my mother-in-law are just apples and oranges and should not be left alone in the same room for too long.
See also: and, apple, orange

apples to oranges

A comparison of two unlike things or people. Oh, you can't compare those two companies, that's apples to oranges.
See also: apple, orange, to

compare apples and oranges

To try to highlight the similarities between two different things—which typically cannot be done. You can't compare your job as a nurse to mine as an engineer—that's comparing apples and oranges!
See also: and, apple, compare, orange

compare apples to oranges

To compare two unlike things or people. Stop comparing apples to oranges—those two companies you're talking about are completely different.
See also: apple, compare, orange, to

go gathering orange blossoms

To look for a wife. The phrase refers to the frequent use of orange blossoms as wedding decorations symbolizing the bride's innocence. I'm quite certain that Sir Andrew went to town to go gathering orange blossoms, so we'd best get ready for a wedding!
See also: blossom, gathering, go, orange

like comparing apples and oranges

Highlighting the similarities and differences between two people or things that are not really comparable at all. You can't compare your job as a nurse to mine as an engineer—that's like comparing apples and oranges! Look, comparing the business model of a small local business to that of a giant global conglomerate is like comparing apples and oranges—they are two completely different things!
See also: and, apple, compare, like, orange

mix apples and oranges

To combine or compare two different things. You can't compare your job as a nurse to mine as an engineer—that's mixing apples and oranges!
See also: and, apple, mix, orange

squeeze an orange

To make use of everything someone or something has to offer. This business is like squeezing an orange: it doesn't matter who's doing the squeezing, you'll still get orange juice.
See also: orange, squeeze
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

apples and oranges

Fig. two entities that are not similar. (Used especially in reference to comparisons of unlike things.) You can't talk about Fred and Ted in the same breath! They're like apples and oranges. Talking about her current book and her previous bestseller is like comparing apples and oranges.
See also: and, apple, orange
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

apples and oranges

Unlike objects or persons, as in Assessing the problems of the neighborhood grocery by examining a giant supermarket is comparing apples and oranges . This metaphor for dissimilarity began as apples and oysters, which appeared in John Ray's proverb collection of 1670. It is nearly always accompanied by a warning that one cannot compare such different categories.
See also: and, apple, orange
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

apples and oranges

If you say that two things are apples and oranges, you mean that they are completely different and cannot be compared. We really can't compare the data any more, it's not the same — it's just apples and oranges. Note: You can also say that comparing two things is like comparing apples with oranges. To compare one with the other is to make the mistake we were all warned about in third grade, not to compare apples with oranges.
See also: and, apple, orange
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

apples and oranges

(of two people or things) irreconcilably or fundamentally different. North American
See also: and, apple, orange

all Lombard Street to a China orange

great wealth against one ordinary object; virtual certainty. dated
Lombard Street in London was originally occupied by bankers from Lombardy, and it still contains a number of London's principal banks. This idiom dates from the early 19th century, but the use of a China orange to mean ‘a worthless thing’ is recorded earlier.
See also: all, china, orange, street, to

squeeze (or suck) an orange

take all that is profitable out of something.
See also: orange, squeeze
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ˌapples and ˈoranges

(American English) used to describe a situation in which two people or things are completely different from each other: He was no competition for me: it was like apples and oranges.
See also: and, apple, orange
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

apples to oranges

and A2O
phr. & comp. abb. [but that’s comparing] apples to oranges; [You are] making an unfair comparison. Chevvies and Beemers! That’s apples to oranges! They’re not even in the same class! It’s A2O! What can I say?
See also: apple, orange, to
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

apples and oranges, like comparing

Comparing two unlike objects or issues. This term, dating from the second half of the 1900s, has largely replaced the difference between chalk and cheese, at least in America. The latter expression of disparateness is much older, dating from the 1500s. Why apples and oranges, since they’re both fruits, and not some other object is unclear. Nevertheless, it has caught on and is on the way to being a cliché.
See also: and, apple, compare, like
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
One looks like a tropical fish tank while some actually resemble syrupy drinks, so much so that the orangy "Fruit Champagne" and key-lime colored "Citron" were inspired by drinks and look like they were just poured out of a bottle.
'There was a marble-effect fireplace in an orangy colour, all the walls were decorated in purple, pink, orange and yellow stripes, the skirting boards, picture rails and window sills were peach gloss, and the carpets were green.'
"Colours were often hard and tended to fade and go orangy.
orangy vein will be here always, at least in human terms, always until
This is a pure orangy red and is real star in the high summer and autumn garden.
'Kaleidoscope' (1999 AARS winner): Small (2- to 2 1/2-inch-wide), double flowers are orangy tan with yellow centers on a 2- to 4-foot-tall shrub.
She should wear black to promote tranquility, orangy rusts for harmony and browns to calm her mind and introduce more water and earth energy."
The other creature is the orangy, small tortoiseshell butterfly, which also hibernates in coolish places and wakes up if it becomes too warm .
I've always seen both components of Gamma as yellowish orange or orangy yellow.