or else

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or else

1. Otherwise; or as a consequence. We need to book our tickets soon, or else start looking into renting a car. Eat your vegetables, or else you're not getting any dessert!
2. Or suffer some unspecified consequence. (Used as a threat.) Be there at noon with $5,000 in cash, or else!
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or else

or suffer the consequences. (An inspecific threat of bad consequences.) Do what I tell you, or else. Don't be late for work, or else!
See also: else

or else

1. Otherwise, in different circumstances, as in Present your case now, or else you won't have a chance. [c. 1300]
2. Regardless of any extenuating circumstances, no matter what, as in Be there on time or else! [Second half of 1800s]
See also: else

or else


1 used to introduce the second of two possibilities: I can’t get through to Sally. She’s out, or else she’s decided not to answer the telephone.
2 (informal) used to threaten or warn somebody: You’d better clean up this mess, or else!
See also: else

or else

1. Used to indicate an alternative: We need to eat the leftovers or else buy more food.
2. Used to indicate negative consequences that will result if an action is not followed: We need to pay the bill, or else the electricity will be shut off.
3. Used after a command or demand to make a threat: Be there on time, or else!
See also: else
References in classic literature ?
Four months ago they had left the straggling street thronged with busy citizens--groups at every corner, and a chaos of merchandise and traders in the open plaza or square beside the Presbyterian church.
If only it were possible to assemble the hundred or more telephone buildings of New York in one vast plaza, and if the two thousand clerks and three thousand maintenance men and six thousand girl operators were to march to work each morning with bands and banners, then, perhaps, there might be the necessary quality of impressiveness by which any large idea must always be imparted to the public mind.
That," said the galley slave, "is like a man having money at sea when he is dying of hunger and has no way of buying what he wants; I say so because if at the right time I had had those twenty ducats that your worship now offers me, I would have greased the notary's pen and freshened up the attorney's wit with them, so that to-day I should be in the middle of the plaza of the Zocodover at Toledo, and not on this road coupled like a greyhound.
Toward the center of the city was a large plaza, and upon this and in the buildings immediately surrounding it were camped some nine or ten hundred creatures of the same breed as my captors, for such I now considered them despite the suave manner in which I had been trapped.
As we neared the plaza and my presence was discovered we were immediately surrounded by hundreds of the creatures who seemed anxious to pluck me from my seat behind my guard.
The green hordes that use these deserted cities seldom occupy more than a few squares about the central plaza, and as they come and go always across the dead sea bottoms that the cities face, it is usually a matter of comparative ease to enter from the hillside.
Thus I made the journey to the vicinity of the plaza without detection.
Nestled in a deep valley lay a city of Martian concrete, whose every street and plaza and open space was roofed with glass.
Above the central plaza it stopped, slowly settling Marsward.
Leaning over the side of the flier, he saw what appeared to be a red woman being dragged across the plaza by a huge green warrior--one of those fierce, cruel denizens of the dead sea-bottoms and deserted cities of dying Mars.
Look," he said, and pointed a black forefinger toward the end of the village street where a wider space between the huts left a sort of plaza.
The messenger led me through the labyrinthine alleys to an open plaza near the center of the village.
As they approached it, Bradley saw that it was a huge building rising a hundred feet in height from the ground and that it stood alone in the center of what might have been called a plaza in some other part of the world.
What I see is the Cafe Venus, on the plaza of Santiago, where one hot night I drank and talked with a dying consumptive.
It is a most quiet, forlorn, little town; built, as is universally the case in these countries, with the streets running at right angles to each other, and having in the middle a large plaza or square, which, from its size, renders the scantiness of the population more evident.