open-ended

(redirected from open-endedly)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

open-ended

Having no specific or planned ending or outcome. We decided to leave things open-ended, in case we were both in a position to get back together at some point in the future. These are open-ended conversations, meant more to generate ideas than a concrete plan.
References in periodicals archive ?
Marijuana talk, according to Lipset, comprised an important forum in which Murik men engaged one another, not conclusively, but open-endedly, in uneasy, nervous dialogue about the increasingly limited efficacy of male agency in postcolonial PNG.
* Challenge Five: Asking questions more "open-endedly" and more creatively.
Towards the end, the emphasis is clearly placed on Matrix but the essay closes open-endedly, implying rather than stating the moral and other implications of the narratives discussed.
And here you are in your fifties, and your dad is over eighty and no way can you pour your meager wealth, hoarded up in fear of precisely this loss of autonomy and health in your own later years, down the black hole of this old man's indeterminate and open-endedly devouring future, such as it is.
It is divided into the following sections: Introduction; Challenge One: Listening More Carefully and Responsively; Challenge Two: Explaining Your Conversational Intent and Inviting Consent; Challenge Three: Expressing Yourself More Clearly and Completely; Challenge Four: Translating Complaints and Criticisms into Requests; Challenge Five: Asking Questions More "Open-Endedly" and More Creatively; Challenge Six: Expressing More Appreciation; and Challenge Seven: Making Better Communication an Important Part of Everyday Living.
The preferred narrative form among systematic theologians is, as I have already called it, the architectonic, by which I mean two things: first, an account that is open-endedly comprehensive; and second, a description of the development of doctrine in terms of the internal logic of an idea.
When he heuristically extrapolates from his exploration of Derridean argument that "quite simply, we must change" (20), he evades a fundamental question: In what sense can change be deemed a de facto good when free play (change), "always already" in Derridean terms, informs the present nuclear threat and may open-endedly foster numerous future explosions of the imagination with equally horrible potentiality?
Project teams therefore need to focus on a single set of achievable goals, rather than open-endedly examining the possibilities.