open to criticism


Also found in: Legal.

open (oneself) (up) to criticism

1. To do something that leaves oneself vulnerable to criticism from others. Don't ever openly or directly admit that you've done something wrong while you're in a leadership position, or you'll just open yourself to criticism from all sides. The prime minister has really been opening herself up to criticism with the way she's been backpedaling on her positions recently.
2. To allow others to give one criticism. You'll never improve as a writer if you don't open yourself up to criticism more.
See also: criticism, open

open to criticism

1. Able to be criticized by others. All art is open to criticism. We should never say we can't critique something just because it is a "masterpiece."
2. Willing to receive and listen to criticism. Would you mind reading this short story I wrote? I really want to improve my writing, so I'm open to criticism!
See also: criticism, open

open to criticism

vulnerable to criticism. Anything the president does is open to criticism.
See also: criticism, open
References in classic literature ?
Sir Walter Scott's definition of what is vulgar is open to criticism, I fancy.
So he thought that Medea was some archduchess whose conduct was open to criticism.
Where your calling is more open to criticism is when you pry into the secrets of private individuals, when you rake up family matters which are better hidden, and when you incidentally waste the time of men who are more busy than yourself.
A leader should always be open to criticism, not silencing dissent.
Uhuru also asked judicial officers, including Maraga, to grow thick skins and be open to criticism of all nature.
O'Neill (right) said: "If you haven't played well, you leave yourself open to criticism.
Mr Al Zayani said he was open to criticism but explained that negative comments on social media did more damage than good.
Charles said it leaves players open to criticism and heightens the pressures they face as high-earning youngsters in the public glare.
His Highness the Prime Minister noted that he keeps abreast of what circulates on social media, saying that all political leaders should be open to criticism.
While the government is open to criticism, I think it would appreciate it if it were not adversarial, coming from a moral high horse,' Abella said in a press briefing.
But Leboeuf also revealed he warned his former captain the squad's make-up would leave him open to criticism.
Notably omitted from the final statement was a blanket condemnation of anti-Zionism, removed after faculty and various student groups rejected the conflation of anti-Zionism with religious bigotry, insisting that Zionism, as a political doctrine, remain open to criticism.
We are open to criticism but if you present insulting the president as carrying out politics, there will of course be consequences," he told a news conference on Friday.
He also wanted to weed out the students who weren't open to criticism.
Using Vorm without having given him recent match practice would leave the former Espanyol and Southampton boss open to criticism if the 31-year-old drops a clanger at Wembley.