get cracking

(redirected from one was getting cracking)

get cracking

To start working on something. Often used as an imperative. Get cracking, or you'll be up all night working on your book report! Let's get cracking—I don't want to spend all day cleaning out the garage.
See also: cracking, get
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

get cracking

Rur. to get to work. If you want to finish that quilt by Labor Day, you best get cracking. Sit down to your homework and get cracking!
See also: cracking, get
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

get cracking

see under get a move on.
See also: cracking, get
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

get cracking

INFORMAL
If you get cracking, you start doing something immediately and quickly. I realised that if we got cracking, we could make the last 700 miles to St Lucia within our deadline. I promised to get cracking on the deal.
See also: cracking, get
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

get cracking

act quickly and energetically. informal
See also: cracking, get
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

get ˈcracking

(informal) start doing something quickly: We’ll have to get cracking with the painting if we want to be finished by Friday.There’s an awful lot to do, so let’s get cracking.
See also: cracking, get
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

Get cracking!

imperative Get moving!; Get started!; Hurry up! Hurry up! Get cracking!
See also: get
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

get cracking/rolling

Begin, get busy, hurry up. The first of these colloquialisms originated in Great Britain in the 1930s and appears to have crossed the Atlantic during World War II. It uses crack in the sense of “move fast,” a usage dating from the late nineteenth century, and is often put as an imperative, as in “Now get cracking before it starts to rain.” The synonymous get rolling, dating from the first half of the 1900s, alludes to setting wheels in motion. It, too, may be used as an imperative, but is more often heard in such locutions as “Jake said it’s time to get rolling on the contracts.”
See also: cracking, get, roll
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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