run with the hare and hunt with the hounds

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run with the hare and hunt with the hounds

1. To support or attempt to placate both sides of a conflict or dispute. Many have criticized the government of running with the hare and hunting with the hounds regarding the territorial dispute between the two nations.
2. To act duplicitously or hypocritically; to speak or act out against something while engaging or taking part in it. How can you be taken seriously as a reformer when you have continued to accept gifts? You can't run with the hare and hunt with the hounds, Senator.
See also: and, hare, hound, hunt, run
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

run with the hare and hunt with the hounds

Fig. to support both sides of a dispute. In our office politics, Sally always tries to run with the hare and hunt with the hounds, telling both the clerical workers and the management that she thinks they should prevail.
See also: and, hare, hound, hunt, run
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

run with the hare and hunt with the hounds

BRITISH, LITERARY
If someone runs with the hare and hunts with the hounds, they try to support both sides in an argument or fight. They want to keep the peace and have everybody happy. For this reason they learn very quickly to run with the hares and hunt with the hounds. Note: A hound is a dog that has been bred for hunting.
See also: and, hare, hound, hunt, run
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

run with the hare and hunt with the hounds

try to remain on good terms with both sides in a conflict or dispute. British
This expression has been in use since the mid 15th century.
See also: and, hare, hound, hunt, run
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

run with the ˌhare and hunt with the ˈhounds

try to remain friendly with both sides in a quarrel: I know you want to keep everyone happy, but I’m afraid you can’t run with the hare and hunt with the hounds on this issue.
See also: and, hare, hound, hunt, run
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

run with the hare, hunt with the hounds, to

To stay in favor with two opponents; to take both sides at the same time. This expression, with its analogy to being both hunted and hunter, dates from the fifteenth century and appeared in Heywood’s 1546 proverb collection. John Lyly used it in Euphues (1580): “Whatsoeuer I speake to men, the same also I speake to women, I meane not to run with the Hare and holde with the Hounde.” The meaning is quite different from a similar-sounding cliché, to run with the pack, which means to take the same side as the majority. However, both these terms may be dying out in America.
See also: hunt, run, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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