run the show

(redirected from one has run the show)

run the show

To have autonomy or authority over something; to be in control of something. You can tell that the manager, so used to running the show in the office, is finding it hard to adjust to having a boss of his own just a few doors down. I'm the director, so I run the show here, OK? My word is final.
See also: run, show
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

run the show

to be in charge; to be in command. Who's running this show? No, I don't want to have to run the show again.
See also: run, show
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

run the show

Take charge, assume control, as in Ever since Bill retired from the business, his daughter's been running the show. The word show here simply means "kind of undertaking." [First half of 1900s] A similar usage is run one's own show, meaning "exert control over one's own activities" or "act independently." For example, The high school drama club didn't ask permission to perform that play-they want to run their own show . [Mid-1900s]
See also: run, show
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

run the show

INFORMAL
COMMON If someone runs the show, they are in control of an organization, event, or situation. So who's actually running the show around here? What board of directors? You know as well as I do that you're the one who runs the show!
See also: run, show
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

run the show

(sometimes disapproving) be in control of a plan, a project, an organization, etc: Why does Sheila always have to run the show? There are plenty of other people who could organize the event just as well as her.
See also: run, show
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

run the show, to

To take charge. Originating in the mid-nineteenth-century theater, this term was transferred to being responsible for any kind of enterprise. John Braine used it in Room at the Top (1957): “The accountants and the engineers run the show no matter who’s in charge.” See also call the shots.
See also: run, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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