(one's) word (of honor)

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(one's) word (of honor)

One's sincere promise or vow (about or to do something). I will be in that court to stand by your side during the trail—I give you my word of honor. After the president broke his word about lowering taxes for middle-class earners, I vowed never to vote for him again.
See also: word

word

1. A message from someone or something. I just got word that Diana landed in New York.
2. slang An expression of affirmation. A: "That concert was amazing!" B: "Word."

*word (from someone or something)

messages or communication from someone or something. (*Typically: get ~; have ~; hear ~; receive ~.) We have just received word from Perry that the contract has been signed.

your, his, etc. ˌword of ˈhonour

(British English) (American English your, his, etc. ˌword of ˈhonor) used to refer to somebody’s sincere promise: He gave me his word of honour that he’d never drink again.
See also: honour, of, word

Word

1. and Word up. interj. Correct.; Right. I hear you, man. Word.
2. interj. Hello. (see also What’s the (good) word?.) Word. What’s new? A: Word. B: Word.
References in periodicals archive ?
In its quest to teach the English language globally, One's Word proudly launches its online English school in Latin America.
One's Word, an English language training company, has recently announced the launch of its online English school in Latin America in March 2014.
One's Word hosts online English language training courses over Skype for audiences in many different parts of the word.
8220;English is the current language of international business and education,” says Yuki Matsuoka, CEO of One's Word Inc.
Starting its operations in Latin America from March, 2014, One's Word will conduct online sessions through Skype.
For Kleindienst, political values are far less important than the superficial personal values of the Republican mandarins: unswerving devotion to administration goals and, upso facto, to the country; strong adherence to political principles, whatever the substantive content of those principles; and the keeping of one's word.
It is not clever or sophisticated to obscure the meaning of one's words to minimize conflict or to mislead; it can be simple falsehood.