balm in Gilead

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balm in Gilead

A source of comfort, healing, or restoration. The phrase originates in the Bible. I find that the act of writing has always been a balm in Gilead for me. No matter what burden weighs on my mind, writing helps me cope with it.
See also: balm
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

balm in Gilead

Cure or solace. The expression comes from the Book of Jeremiah (8:22): “Is there no balm in Gilead; is there no physician there?” The King James version translator took as “balm” the Hebrew word sori, which probably meant the resin of the mastic tree; John Wycliffe translated it as “gumme” and Miles Coverdale as “triacle” (treacle). By the nineteenth century, the term was used figuratively for consolation in a time of trouble, by Edgar Allan Poe (in “The Raven”), Charlotte Brontë, and others.
See also: balm
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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