on your uppers

on your uppers

or

down on your uppers

BRITISH, INFORMAL, OLD-FASHIONED
If a person or a company is on their uppers or down on their uppers, they have very little money. The company is on its uppers and shareholders can forget about receiving dividends for a couple of years. Simon pays cash for his ceramics because he finds so many potters are down on their uppers. Note: The upper of a shoe is the top part of it, which is attached to the sole and heel. If you are on your uppers, you have worn through the sole and heel.
See also: on, upper

on your uppers

extremely short of money. informal
In this expression, worn-out shoes are taken as an indication of someone's poverty; the upper is the part of a shoe above the sole, which is all that is left after the sole has been worn away.
See also: on, upper

on your ˈuppers

(British English, informal) having very little money: Joe paid for lunch, which was great because we were both on our uppers, as usual. OPPOSITE: (be) rolling in it/money Uppers refers to the top part of a boot or shoe. If you are walking on your uppers, your shoes are old and worn down.
See also: on, upper