on the other hand

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on the other hand

From a different, conflicting, or contradictory point of view. (Sometimes preceded by "on the one hand" to specifically set up a contrast between the two points of view.) This deal could really help the business get out of debt. Though, on the other hand, you'd just be indebted to the government instead. I'm really torn. On the one hand, I'd be starting a high-paying job doing what I've always wanted for a living. But on the other hand, I'd have to move halfway around the world from all my friends and family to do it.
See also: hand, on, other

on the other hand

Fig. a phrase introducing an alternate view. John: I'm ready to go; on the other hand, I'm perfectly comfortable here. Sally: I'll let you know when I'm ready, then. Mary: I like this one. On the other hand, this is nice too. Sue: Why not get both?
See also: hand, on, other

on the other hand

see under on the one hand.
See also: hand, on, other

on the other hand

As another point of view; from another standpoint.
See also: hand, on, other
References in classic literature ?
He used to go ashore every night to foregather in some hotel's parlour with his crony, the mate of the barque Cicero, lying on the other side of the Circular Quay.
On the other hand, at end-June 2018 E.ON had short-term financial liabilities of EUR0.8 billion, largely neutral free cash flow over 2018-2019 and net acquisitions of about EUR15.7 billion (negative) scheduled for 2H19, totalling EUR16.5 billion.
On the other hand, the sale matches E.ON's plans to dispose of assets in order to cut its debt.
E.ON, on the other hand, could then appeal to a Spanish court to demand compensation form the Spanish government for damages.
Wheeler too easily conflates the description of Africans at the less developed end of the Scottish tale of technological progress and civil freedom on the one hand, and some naturalist linkages of Africans with lower levels of intelligence and capacity on the other. Most Scottish empirical rationalists were describing processes, potentially accessible to all human groups, not static "natural" characteristics.
IT organizations, on the other hand, have few targets and even fewer measurements, and those that do exist are frequently driven by hardware or software are constraints rather than business goals.