on the other hand

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on the other hand

From a different, conflicting, or contradictory point of view. (Sometimes preceded by "on the one hand" to specifically set up a contrast between the two points of view.) This deal could really help the business get out of debt. Though on the other hand, you'd just be indebted to the government instead. I'm really torn. On the one hand, I'd be starting a high-paying job doing what I've always wanted for a living; but on the other hand, I'd have to move halfway around the world from all my friends and family to do it.
See also: hand, on, other

on the other hand

Fig. a phrase introducing an alternate view. John: I'm ready to go; on the other hand, I'm perfectly comfortable here. Sally: I'll let you know when I'm ready, then. Mary: I like this one. On the other hand, this is nice too. Sue: Why not get both?
See also: hand, on, other

on the other hand

see under on the one hand.
See also: hand, on, other

OTOH

phr. on the other hand. (An initialism. A computer abbreviation, not pronounced.) That’s one good idea. OTOH, there must be many other satisfactory procedures.

on the other hand

As another point of view; from another standpoint.
See also: hand, on, other
References in classic literature ?
On the other hand, when there have been accidents, increased expenses of operating, or contracts with less profitable terms, I have always succeeded in getting the railroad to lower its rate.
But, on the other hand, you are being eaten up in turn by the bigger dogs, wherefore you squeal.
Thus in sleep, in a fever, in madness, or in any very violent emotions of soul, our ideas may approach to our impressions; as, on the other hand, it sometimes happens, that our impressions are so faint and low that we cannot distinguish them from our ideas.
With Rosamond, on the other hand, he pouted and was wayward--nay, often uncomplimentary, much to her inward surprise; nevertheless he was gradually becoming necessary to her entertainment by his companionship in her music, his varied talk, and his freedom from the grave preoccupation which, with all her husband's tenderness and indulgence, often made his manners unsatisfactory to her, and confirmed her dislike of the medical profession.
But besides that I neither have so high an opinion of myself as to be willing to make promise of anything extraordinary, nor feed on imaginations so vain as to fancy that the public must be much interested in my designs; I do not, on the other hand, own a soul so mean as to be capable of accepting from any one a favor of which it could be supposed that I was unworthy.
Their love was as fair and whole as human love can be--perfect self-sacrifice on the one side meeting a young and true heart on the other.