on the loose


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on the loose

Having been freed from some restraint or free in an environment with the potential to cause mischief, damage, or harm. Every time the Navy boat pulls into the harbor, there are sailors on the loose all over the city. There are reports of a large bear on the loose in the lower mountain town.
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on the loose

running around free. Look out! There is a bear on the loose from the zoo. Most kids enjoy being on the loose when they go to college.
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on the loose

1. At large, free, as in That dog of theirs is on the loose all the time. [Second half of 1800s]
2. Acting without restraint, as in After the game the players were in town, on the loose. [Mid-1700s]
See also: loose, on

on the loose

COMMON
1. If a dangerous person or animal is on the loose, they are free because they have escaped from somewhere. The person who carried out those awful murders is still on the loose. There was a lion on the loose in the building.
2. If someone is on the loose, they are not being controlled or looked after by anyone and they are free to behave however they want. The movie is about a young boy on the loose in New York.
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(be) on the ˈloose


1 (of an escaped prisoner, animal, etc.) be free: There are ten prisoners on the loose. OPPOSITE: under lock and key
2 be enjoying a period of freedom from your normal life or usual rules and restrictions: Her boyfriend’s on the loose in Paris this weekend, but she doesn’t seem to mind.
See also: loose, on

on the loose

1. At large; free.
2. Acting in an uninhibited fashion.
See also: loose, on