on the edge of (something)

on the edge of (something)

Very close to doing something or of having some imminent event happen, especially that which is bad or disastrous. The company is still doing business, but ever since the recession hit, they've been teetering on the edge of closing down. The crew are so maddened by the cuts to their pay that everyone is on the edge of mutiny.
See also: edge, of, on
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

*on the edge

Fig. very anxious and about to become distraught; on the verge of becoming irrational. (*Typically: be ~; live ~. See also on edge.) After the horrible events of the last week, we are all on the edge.
See also: edge, on
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

on the edge

1. In a precarious position; also, in a state of keen excitement, as from danger or risk. For example, When the stock market crashed, their whole future was on the edge, or Skydivers obviously must enjoy living on the edge.
2. on the edge of. On the point of doing something, as in He was on the edge of winning the election when the sex scandal broke. [c. 1600] Both def. 1 and 2 allude to the danger of falling over the edge of a precipice.
See also: edge, on
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

on the edge

1. In a precarious position.
2. In a state of keen excitement, as from danger or risk: "the excitement of combat, of living on the edge" (Nelson DeMille).
See also: edge, on
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See also: