on the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog


Also found in: Wikipedia.

on the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog

A phrase that highlights the anonymous nature of online correspondence. It originally appeared in a cartoon by Peter Steiner. A: "I can't say something that mean, even to a stranger." B: "Oh, sure you can! On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog."
See also: dog, know, nobody, on
References in periodicals archive ?
We all remember that iconic 1993 The New Yorker cartoon with the caption, "On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog." However--in this day and age--various marketers and advertisers, stalkers, potential employers, social media networks, and probably the government not only know that you're a dog, but also know your breed or mixture of breeds, how old you are, who shares your household, and whether you like wet food or dry food.
The caption reads: "On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog." Since artists these days can be just about anybody if they put their mind to it (think Nikki S.
As the famous New Yorker cartoon remarked, on the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog. Nobody in fandom knew if you were a pimply adolescent, either, if you didn't want them to.
The one seated at the computer says to the other dog who's looking up at him: "On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog.' That is true, of course.