on a knife-edge

on a knife-edge

Very anxious or worried about a difficult or stressful situation. I am on a knife-edge right now, waiting to hear if my contract has been extended—if not, I'll need to find a new job. Our grandmother is very ill, so we are all on a knife-edge these days.
See also: on

on a knife-edge

mainly BRITISH
COMMON If someone or something is on a knife-edge, they are in a situation in which nobody knows whether something good or something bad is going to happen next. No further incidents have been reported today, but this remains a town on the knife-edge of conflict. With recovery poised on a knife-edge the country needs a leader with vision and stature. Note: You can also say that someone walks a knife-edge. The company could fail at any moment. They're walking a knife-edge. Note: You can also use knife-edge before a noun. The government faces a knife-edge vote on its plans for the coal industry.
See also: on

on a knife-edge (or razor's edge)

in a tense situation, especially one finely balanced between success and failure.
2000 South African Times UK With the game poised on a knife-edge, the Wallabies won a ruck and George Gregan's pass was floated to the flyhalf, who picked his line perfectly.
See also: on

on a ˈknife-edge

(also on a ˈrazor’s edge) in a very dangerous or difficult situation where there is a risk of something terrible happening: He was balanced on a knife-edge between life and death.The future of this company is on a razor’s edge.
See also: on
References in periodicals archive ?
It's fair to say that tonight's Arsenal-Milan tie isn't balanced on a knife-edge.