old salt

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old salt

A sailor, especially a man, who is older and/or has had a lot of experience on the seas. The bar was packed with old salts who'd travelled all across the world, sharing stories of their adventures.
See also: old, salt
References in periodicals archive ?
The 22nd Annual Old Salt Fall King of the Beach tournament, held Nov.
And looking for all the world like a crowd of old salts, these lads, far right, appear on the past cover of a collection of sea shanties recorded back in the early Seventies by Radio Cleveland.
ey wanted to brave the saved the old salts call lot of waves.
OLD SALTS 25 MOSELEY OAK 17 MOSELEY Oak could not pull the match out of the fire despite battering Old Salts for the last ten minutes.
RIVERSIDE HOMES: Two bearded old salts outside one of the Egremont cottages; and, inset, below, Slack Cottages, on the site THEIR weather-beaten faces and gnarled hands betrayed decades of rough lives as crew members on sailing ships criss-crossing the seven seas.
A vending machine full of toy ships is tipped over in slow-mo as, like A-Team meets Space Cowboys, the crew ready it for the fray, aided by the old salts who used it last (and don't seem to have left).
Around this time of the year old salts often like to reminisce about 'the good old days' of ocean racing: the great boats that have won past Rolex Sydney Hobarts and the legendary yachties who sailed them through the rugged waters of the Tasman Sea.
That's why old salts handle stingrays with extra care and newcomers who don't are laid out on the deck.
LAST Wednesday, around 2pm, after the Freedom of Liverpool scrolls dedicated to the Merchant Navy were ceremonially placed in St Nicholas's parish church, sundry old salts and their judies needed a tot of Nelson's Blood.
There are loads of good old salts who could have made good use of that wasted cash and I know it would have been much appreciated.
I realize this is a purely personal and controversial reaction, but shouldn't old sailor ballads come closer to sounding like they're being sung by old salts than tuxedoed sophisticates?