off

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Related to offs: Tax Write-Offs

off

1. Finished with one's work for the day. Often followed by the word "work." I'll be off at 6, if you want to meet me then. I need to get these presents wrapped before my wife gets off work.
2. Not attending work or school. I can't wait to be off on my vacation next month. I'm off for two weeks for Christmas, so we'll definitely hang out then!
3. Not correct or accurate. Often followed by "on (something)." The measurements were a bit off, so the shelves don't fit quite right. Sorry, your guess was way off! They were off on their initial valuation by several hundred thousand dollars.
4. Having begun something. Often followed by "on (something)." Dad's off on another mission to protect us innocent kids from violence in the media. I heard you're travelling to India—when are you heading off?
5. Travelling (to some place). We're off to the Bahamas for the next two weeks! I heard you're travelling to India—when are you heading off?
6. verb To kill someone, especially as a means of silencing or disposing of them. In this usage, the term is usually followed by a noun or pronoun. The gang offed the accountant before he could use his knowledge as leverage with the district attorney. I puked my guts out the first time I offed somebody, now it feels like second nature.

*off (work)

 and off from work; off of work 
1. having left one's work at the end of the day. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) What time do you get off from work? I get off work about five o'clock. She gets off from work later than I do.
2. absent from one's work with permission. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) I think I can get off of work so I can go to the doctor. Sorry, I can't join you. Things are busy at the office, and I can't get off.

*off

 (on something)
1. incorrect in one's planning or prediction. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) I was off on my estimates a little bit. I guess I was off too much.
2. to have started on something, such as a task or a journey. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) What time should we be off on our trip? We should be off by dawn. I'm off on my diet again.
3. Sl. to get high on some kind of drug. Max likes to get off on marijuana.

off

1. mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. She is truly off.
2. tv. to dispose of someone or something; to kill someone. The crooks offed the witness before the trial.
3. in. to die. (see also outed.) The guy just falls down and offs, right there on Main Street.

offed

verb
See outed
See also: off

off

/out of (one's) gourd Slang
Very foolish; crazy.

off

/out of plumb
Not vertical.
See:
References in classic literature ?
The rifle firing from the boats had ceased, and I made no doubt that they were finished off and that the end had come to everything.
In a dim way I heard a rifle go off and continue to go off.
the Knight asked in a tone of great interest, clasping his arms round the horse's neck as he spoke, just in time to save himself from tumbling off again.
When I used to wear it, if I fell off the horse, it always touched the ground directly.
Hans stood looking on for a while, and at last said, 'You must be well off, master grinder
Up went the steps, bang went the door, round whirled the wheels, and off they rattled, with Kit's mother hanging out at one window waving a damp pocket-handkerchief and screaming out a great many messages to little Jacob and the baby, of which nobody heard a word.
We never shook him off not a dozen yards in the six miles.
Off the road he couldn't go; the exploit must have been connected with horses or vehicles to hang in the old fellow's head.
I could hear the owls and the wolves away off in the woods, and it seemed terri- ble still.
Then he went down on all fours and crawled off, begging them to let him alone, and he rolled himself up in his blanket and wallowed in under the old pine table, still a-begging; and then he went to crying.
You must have seen old Kerick polishing off a drove.
And Kotick went off and danced the Fire-dance with a very heavy little heart.
When she had got round the turn, she gave herself a push off with one foot, and skated straight up to Shtcherbatsky.
The tradition is kept up here that you are the best of skaters," she said, with her little black-gloved hand brushing a grain of hoarfrost off her muff.
As we emerged into this river-bed path suddenly we started a troop of tall giraffes, who galloped, or rather sailed off, in their strange gait, their tails screwed up over their backs, and their hoofs rattling like castanets.