offing

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in the offing

In the future; happening soon. A vacation is in the offing for me, and I couldn't be more ready for it.
See also: offing

off

1. Finished with one's work for the day. Often followed by the word "work." I'll be off at 6, if you want to meet me then. I need to get these presents wrapped before my wife gets off work.
2. Not attending work or school. I can't wait to be off on my vacation next month. I'm off for two weeks for Christmas, so we'll definitely hang out then!
3. Not correct or accurate. Often followed by "on (something)." The measurements were a bit off, so the shelves don't fit quite right. Sorry, your guess was way off! They were off on their initial valuation by several hundred thousand dollars.
4. Having begun something. Often followed by "on (something)." Dad's off on another mission to protect us innocent kids from violence in the media. I heard you're travelling to India—when are you heading off?
5. Traveling (to some place). We're off to the Bahamas for the next two weeks! I heard you're travelling to India—when are you heading off?
6. verb To kill someone, especially as a means of silencing or disposing of them. In this usage, the term is usually followed by a noun or pronoun. The gang offed the accountant before he could use his knowledge as leverage with the district attorney. I puked my guts out the first time I offed somebody, now it feels like second nature.

in the offing

happening at some time in the future. There is a big investigation in the offing, but I don't know when. It's hard to tell what's in the offing if you don't keep track of things.
See also: offing

*off

 (on something)
1. incorrect in one's planning or prediction. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) I was off on my estimates a little bit. I guess I was off too much.
2. to have started on something, such as a task or a journey. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) What time should we be off on our trip? We should be off by dawn. I'm off on my diet again.
3. Sl. to get high on some kind of drug. Max likes to get off on marijuana.

*off (work)

 and off from work; off of work 
1. having left one's work at the end of the day. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) What time do you get off from work? I get off work about five o'clock. She gets off from work later than I do.
2. absent from one's work with permission. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) I think I can get off of work so I can go to the doctor. Sorry, I can't join you. Things are busy at the office, and I can't get off.

in the offing

In the near or immediate future; soon to come. For example, Jan was delighted that exams were finished and graduation was in the offing. This expression originally meant "in the part of the ocean visible between shore and horizon"; its figurative use dates from the late 1700s. Also see in the wind.
See also: offing

in the offing

If something is in the offing, it is likely to happen soon. A general amnesty for political prisoners may be in the offing. With Sybil's wedding in the offing I'm hoping this cough isn't infectious.
See also: offing

in the offing

nearby; likely to happen or appear soon.
This expression originated as a nautical term for a distance offshore, beyond a harbour or anchoring ground. It has been used figuratively since the late 18th century.
See also: offing

in the ˈoffing

(informal) likely or about to happen soon: There’s a pay rise in the offing, I hear.The offing is the furthest part of the sea that you can see from land. Ships that are in the offing will soon arrive at the land.
See also: offing

off

1. mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. She is truly off.
2. tv. to dispose of someone or something; to kill someone. The crooks offed the witness before the trial.
3. in. to die. (see also outed.) The guy just falls down and offs, right there on Main Street.

off

/out of (one's) gourd Slang
Very foolish; crazy.

in the offing

1. In the near or immediate future; soon to come: with exams finished and graduation in the offing.
2. Nearby; at hand.
See also: offing

off

/out of plumb
Not vertical.

in the offing

In the future; likely to occur. The term was first used in the seventeenth century to describe the open sea as seen between shore and horizon. In the eighteenth century it began to be used figuratively to describe something nearby or in prospect. Thus Nancy Mitford wrote (Love in a Cold Climate, 1949), “That look of concentration which comes over French faces when a meal is in the offing.”
See also: offing
References in classic literature ?
A great bank, half a mile out, nigh the mouth of the bay, breaks the force of the main ocean coming in from the offing. Winter and summer, when the tide flows over the quicksand, the sea seems to leave the waves behind it on the bank, and rolls its waters in smoothly with a heave, and covers the sand in silence.
As when a goat-herd from some high post watches a storm drive over the deep before the west wind--black as pitch is the offing and a mighty whirlwind draws towards him, so that he is afraid and drives his flock into a cave--even thus did the ranks of stalwart youths move in a dark mass to battle under the Ajaxes, horrid with shield and spear.
But damn the bit of manners has the fellow, any more than if he was one of them Guineas down in the kitchen there; and so as he was sheering nearer, every stretch he made toward the house, I could do no better than to let your honor know that the chap was in the offing.”
The sea in the offing was black and rolling; thunder-clouds lay low on the horizon, split by broad flashes of lightning.
In the offing the sea and the sky were welded together without a joint, and in the luminous space the tanned sails of the barges drifting up with the tide seemed to stand still in red clusters of canvas sharply peaked, with gleams of varnished sprits.
I was now furnished with roots and corn, such as it was, and water; and leaving my friendly negroes, I made forward for about eleven days more, without offering to go near the shore, till I saw the land run out a great length into the sea, at about the distance of four or five leagues before me; and the sea being very calm, I kept a large offing to make this point.