offering


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offer the olive branch (to someone)

To extend an offer or gesture of peace, reconciliation, truce, etc. (to someone), so as to end a disagreement or dispute. (Can also be formulated as "offer someone the olive branch.") The conservatives in Congress seem to be offering the olive branch to Democrats on the issue of raising the debt ceiling. If you find yourself in a spat with a friend, try to be the bigger person and be the one to offer the olive branch. I was still hurt by the way my parents had lied to me, but I decided to offer them the olive branch at Christmas.
See also: branch, offer, olive

offer an olive branch (to someone)

To extend an offer or gesture of peace, reconciliation, truce, etc. (to someone), so as to end a disagreement or dispute. (Can also be formulated as "offer someone an olive branch.") The conservatives in Congress seem to be offering an olive branch to Democrats on the issue of raising the debt ceiling. If you find yourself in a spat with a friend, try to be the bigger person and be the one to offer an olive branch. I was still hurt by the way my parents had lied to me, but I decided to offer them an olive branch at Christmas.
See also: branch, offer, olive

peace offering

An item or gesture extended to another person to express remorse or forgiveness. After they had their first big argument, Mark brought Monica a box of her favorite chocolate as a peace offering.
See also: offering, peace

offer (something) up (to someone or something)

To give or submit something as an offering. The fact that you're expected to offer money up alongside one's prayer and devotion makes be a bit dubious of that church. The restaurant offers up some of the best steak money can buy. We're offering up exclusive deals to our VIP members this weekend at shops across the country.
See also: offer, someone, up

offer for (one) to (do something)

To suggest that one do something that would likely be beneficial or advantageous to one. I offered for her to move in with me so she wouldn't have to pay rent while she waited for her house to be repaired, but she said she wasn't ready for that just yet. Instead of letting him go outright, they offered for him to take a lower-paying position instead.
See also: offer

offer (something) for (something)

To propose that something or some amount of money be given in exchange for something else. They only offered me $200 for my car! I'm offering this brand new scooter for your bike—that's a great deal for you!
See also: offer

offer to

1. To suggest or propose doing something on behalf of someone or for someone's benefit. Jim offered to cook dinner because I wasn't feeling very well. She offered to speak to the boss to clear the issue up.
2. To suggest or propose giving to someone as a gift, favor, payment, compensation, etc. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "offer" and "to." He offered $500 to me so that I wouldn't speak about the incident to the police or the media. I'm offering half my assets to my partner in exchange for full control over the intellectual property.
See also: offer

offer something to someone (as something)

to propose giving something to someone as a gift, peace offering, payment, etc. They offered us a bunch of flowers as a peace offering. As an apology, I offered a gift to the hostess.
See also: offer

a ˈpeace offering

a present that you give to somebody to show that you are sorry for something or want to make peace after an argument: He left her chocolates as a peace offering, hoping that she would forgive him.
See also: offering, peace
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, while Rule 144A offerings may not offer the liquidity advantages of a public offering, these transactions require less time, are not subject to a schedule determined in part by the speed and scope of SEC review, and yet can still provide benefits that exceed those of traditional private placements.
Issuing stock, debt or other securities to investors in a public offering involves registering the securities and the company with the SEC, thus subjecting the company to extensive disclosure and corporate governance requirements imposed by law (including the recent Sarbanes-Oxley legislation and related rules).