offense

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give offense to

To cause tension or displeasure. I tried to choose my words carefully, but, due to the controversial subject matter, I feared that I would give offense to the committee no matter what I said.
See also: give, offense

hanging offense

A crime, misdeed, or impropriety that is (hyperbolically) perceived to warrant death by hanging. Primarily heard in US. Political correctness has become so authoritarian these days that saying anything with even the slightest derogatory implication is seen as a hanging offense!
See also: hanging, offense

mean no offense

To not imply or intend any offensive meaning in what one says or does. Usually used in the past tense. I truly meant no offense by what I said—I was just making a literal observation about your clothes, that's all! I'm sure you meant no offense, but just consider for a moment how someone might interpret what you said.
See also: mean, no, offense

no offense

What I have said or am about to say is not meant to offend or insult you, even though it could be interpreted that way. No offense, but I think it may be time you cleaned up your kitchen. All I'm saying is that I think we could use some more help with the renovation. No offense, John, you've been a big help.
See also: no, offense

no offense meant

What I have said or am about to say is not meant to offend or insult you, even though it could be interpreted that way. No offense meant, but I think it may be time you cleaned up your kitchen. All I'm saying is that I think we could use some more help with the renovation—no offense meant.
See also: meant, no, offense

no offense taken

I was not offended or insulted by what you just said. A: "Sorry, I didn't mean to imply that we didn't appreciate your help!" B: "No worries, no offense taken."
See also: no, offense, taken

not mean any offense

To not imply or intend any offensive meaning in what one says or does. Usually used in the past tense. I truly didn't meant any offense by what I said—I was just making a literal observation about your clothes, that's all! I'm sure you never meant any offense, but just consider for a moment how someone might interpret what you said.
See also: any, mean, not, offense

take offense (at) (something)

To be or feel insulted, offended, or humiliated by something. I know your comments were made completely in jest, but I couldn't help taking offense at them. I noticed your parents leaving early. I do hope they haven't taken offense.
See also: offense, take

the best defense is a good offense

Proactively attacking one's opponents or enemies is the best way to protect oneself, since they will be occupied with defending themselves, rather than attacking. They have a lot of scoring power, so we need to attack the goal early and wear them out. The best defense is a good offense, girls.
See also: defense, good, offense

best defense is a good offense

Prov. If you attack your opponents, they will be so busy fighting off your attack that they will not be able to attack you. (Often associated with sports. Often pronounced with the accent on the first syllable, similar to offense.) The team mostly practiced offensive moves because the coach believed that the best defense is a good offense. Jim thought that the best defense is a good offense, so he always tried to pass other drivers before they could pass him.
See also: defense, good, offense

mean no offense

not to intend to offend. (See also take no offense.) I'm really sorry. I meant no offense. It was simply a slip of the tongue. He meant no offense by it.
See also: mean, no, offense

No offense meant.

I did not mean to offend [you]. (See also No offense taken.) Mary: Excuse that last remark. No offense meant. Susan: It's okay. I was not offended.
See also: meant, no, offense

No offense taken.

I am not offended [by what you said]. (See also No offense meant.) Pete: Excuse that last remark. I did not want to offend you. Tom: It's okay. No offense taken.
See also: no, offense, taken

take offense (at someone or something)

to be insulted by someone or something. Bill took offense at Mary for her thoughtless remarks. Almost everyone took offense at Bill's new book. I'm sorry you took offense. I meant no harm.
See also: offense, take

no offense

Please don't feel insulted, I don't mean to offend you, as in No offense, but I think you're mistaken. This expression, first recorded in 1829, generally accompanies a statement that could be regarded as insulting but is not meant to be, as in the example.
See also: no, offense

take offense

Feel resentment or emotional pain, as in I didn't realize he'd take offense when he wasn't invited. [Mid-1800s]
See also: offense, take
References in periodicals archive ?
ANOVAs indicated that delinquents who would go on to commit violent offenses did not have significantly more prior criminal offenses, from any category, than delinquents who would not go on to commit a violent offense.
other alleged offenses into account, (17) the federal approach is truly
In 1998, the American Bar Association counted more than 3,300 separate federal criminal offenses on the books--more than 40 percent of which had been enacted in just the past 30 years.
The line graph shows the average size of the prison population according to the type of criminal offense.
Of the 4,393 offenses motivated by racial bias, 67.5 percent resulted from an antiblack bias, 20.2 percent resulted from an antiwhite bias and 6.1 percent resulted from bias against Asians or Pacific Islanders.
This meant focusing arrests on victimless offenses that disrupted social decorum, such as drunkenness, disorderly conduct, vagrancy, and the like.
"From 1990 to 1994, incarceration for drug offenses accounted for 60 percent of the increase in the black population in state prisons and 91 percent of the increase in federal prisons," according to an article in the January/February issue of Public Health Reports.
* In 2012, 20.4 percent of arson offenses were cleared by arrest or exceptional means.
Of the 7,690 single-bias hate crime offenses reported in the above incidents:
A category in the policy involves citations for offenses for before or after hour's service - ranging from the first offense of a warning to a fifth offense of loss of license.
Normally, the offense will be giving the ball to sure-handed players.
Computer crime, on the other hand, comprises such an ill-defined list of offenses that various units within a police department usually keep the related data separately, if they keep them at all.
* There were 6,598 single-bias incidents that involved 7,775 offenses, 8,322 victims, and 6,219 offenders.
By simply moving one player from the back of the "2 Press" to the middle of the "3 Press," the whole personality of attacking offenses changes drastically.