offense


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Related to offense: No offense meant, take offense

hanging offense

A crime, misdeed, or impropriety that is (hyperbolically) perceived to warrant death by hanging. Primarily heard in US. Political correctness has become so authoritarian these days that saying anything with even the slightest derogatory implication is seen as a hanging offense!
See also: hanging, offense

give offense to

To cause tension or displeasure. I tried to choose my words carefully, but, due to the controversial subject matter, I feared that I would give offense to the committee no matter what I said.
See also: give, offense

the best defense is a good offense

Proactively attacking one's opponents or enemies is the best way to protect oneself, since they will be occupied with defending themselves, rather than attacking. They have a lot of scoring power, so we need to attack the goal early and wear them out. The best defense is a good offense, girls.
See also: defense, good, offense

take offense (at) (something)

To be or feel insulted, offended, or humiliated by something. I know your comments were made completely in jest, but I couldn't help taking offense at them. I noticed your parents leaving early. I do hope they haven't taken offense.
See also: offense, take

no offense

What I have said or am about to say is not meant to offend or insult you, even though it could be interpreted that way. No offense, but I think it may be time you cleaned up your kitchen. All I'm saying is that I think we could use some more help with the renovation. No offense, John, you've been a big help.
See also: no, offense

mean no offense

To not imply or intend any offensive meaning in what one says or does. Usually used in the past tense. I truly meant no offense by what I said—I was just making a literal observation about your clothes, that's all! I'm sure you meant no offense, but just consider for a moment how someone might interpret what you said.
See also: mean, no, offense

not mean any offense

To not imply or intend any offensive meaning in what one says or does. Usually used in the past tense. I truly didn't meant any offense by what I said—I was just making a literal observation about your clothes, that's all! I'm sure you never meant any offense, but just consider for a moment how someone might interpret what you said.
See also: any, mean, not, offense

no offense meant

What I have said or am about to say is not meant to offend or insult you, even though it could be interpreted that way. No offense meant, but I think it may be time you cleaned up your kitchen. All I'm saying is that I think we could use some more help with the renovation—no offense meant.
See also: meant, no, offense

no offense taken

I was not offended or insulted by what you just said. A: "Sorry, I didn't mean to imply that we didn't appreciate your help!" B: "No worries, no offense taken."
See also: no, offense, taken

best defense is a good offense

Prov. If you attack your opponents, they will be so busy fighting off your attack that they will not be able to attack you. (Often associated with sports. Often pronounced with the accent on the first syllable, similar to offense.) The team mostly practiced offensive moves because the coach believed that the best defense is a good offense. Jim thought that the best defense is a good offense, so he always tried to pass other drivers before they could pass him.
See also: defense, good, offense

mean no offense

not to intend to offend. (See also take no offense.) I'm really sorry. I meant no offense. It was simply a slip of the tongue. He meant no offense by it.
See also: mean, no, offense

No offense meant.

I did not mean to offend [you]. (See also No offense taken.) Mary: Excuse that last remark. No offense meant. Susan: It's okay. I was not offended.
See also: meant, no, offense

No offense taken.

I am not offended [by what you said]. (See also No offense meant.) Pete: Excuse that last remark. I did not want to offend you. Tom: It's okay. No offense taken.
See also: no, offense, taken

take offense (at someone or something)

to be insulted by someone or something. Bill took offense at Mary for her thoughtless remarks. Almost everyone took offense at Bill's new book. I'm sorry you took offense. I meant no harm.
See also: offense, take

no offense

Please don't feel insulted, I don't mean to offend you, as in No offense, but I think you're mistaken. This expression, first recorded in 1829, generally accompanies a statement that could be regarded as insulting but is not meant to be, as in the example.
See also: no, offense

take offense

Feel resentment or emotional pain, as in I didn't realize he'd take offense when he wasn't invited. [Mid-1800s]
See also: offense, take
References in periodicals archive ?
the accused A1/2eljko Mikulic, under Sections 1 and 5 of the Operative Part of Judgment - the criminal offense of Organized Crime under Article 250(2) of the CC BiH as read with the criminal offense of Tax Evasion under Article 210(3) of the CC BiH; and under Section 7 of the Operative Part of Judgment - the criminal offense of Money Laundering under Article 209(3) of the CC BiH, all as read with Articles 31 and 53 of the CC BiH;
For sea/water and air public transportation utilities, the violators shall face a fine of P5,000 for the first offense, P10,000 for the second offense, P20,000 for the third offense, and additional increments of P10,000 on top of the fine for the third offense for each subsequent offense.
Table 6--Offenses, Victim Type, by Offense Type, 2012
Property crime includes the offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson.
In general, the Government wants a lesser offense available in case the evidence at trial fails to prove the greater offense beyond a reasonable doubt.
Other categories include "misconduct," which would be offenses that in most states are classified as misdemeanors; "non-traffic," such as not depositing change at a tollbooth; and "traffic offenses."
DUDLEY - The Board of Selectmen has eliminated all warnings for liquor-license infractions, even for so-called minor offenses.
They may be divided into substantive offenses and conspiracy offenses.
Hypothesis 2: ANOVAs indicated that mean age at first arrest was not significantly lower for delinquents who would go on to commit violent (F(1,130)=2.61, p=.11) or nonviolent serious (F(1,130)=3.08, p=.08) offenses. However, of those delinquents whose first arrest was at age 11 or younger (n=55) 18% subsequently committed a violent offense and 51% committed a serious nonviolent offense.
It's whether we want a criminal justice system in which a defendant can be tried again for the same offense if he happens to be acquitted--or even if he's found guilty, in which case punishing him twice would be perfectly OK according to the Supreme Court.
Which type of criminal offense poses the greatest threat to your community?
Of the hate crime incidents reported during 2002, law enforcement identified 8,832 offenses. Crimes against persons made up 67.5 percent of the identified offenses, and crimes against property accounted for 32 percent.
Aggravated assault, which is the most frequently occurring violent crime in the Index, was the only violent offense to show a decrease from the 2000 volume--1.4 percent.
Child welfare reformers, writing about the conditions in which adolescents grew up in turn-of-the-century cities, regularly characterized the police as all-too-eager to discipline teenagers for any offense, major or minor.