off subject

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off subject

Introducing, addressing, or discussing things not relevant to or concerned with the subject at hand. Sometimes hyphenated (always if used immediately before a noun). Make sure you don't go off subject during your lecture, or you'll just confuse your students. This is off-subject a bit, but what do you think about the recent economic trend in the Asian markets? My father always includes this off-subject remarks whenever he tells a story, and it just drags the whole thing out for what feels like an eternity.
See also: off, subject
References in periodicals archive ?
The story was shown to 1,183 participants--half of them saw the story with civil, interesting comments at the end, while the other half got the same story, but with rude, uncivil comments that included namecalling and off-subject insults.
The author: It is difficult to respond to your letter because virtually every sentence is either totally wrong or completely off-subject. First, you aver that you knew someone who died of radiation poisoning a decade after viewing A-bomb testing.
Slightly off-subject, I appreciate that the appalling level of prize-money at some of our tracks cannot be laid at the BGRB door.
Off-subject responses classified units when PTs provided a response without addressing the question directly.
Response Theme PTs (percent) Collaboration benefits: sharing, teaming, working together 59.2 Problem-solving prerequisites: effort, patience, and planning required; importance of compromise 55.1 Collaboration difficulties: lack of time, scheluling conflicts, self-control 30.6 83.7 Gaining new perspectives from peers Insights into future role as a teacher 6.1 Off-subject response 5.9 Elementary Ed.
Although many PTs assumed problem-solving challenges and consensus decision making (e.g., choosing an agreed-upon case study; deciding when, where, or how to meet), some cited off-subject responses in instructor expectations (5.9% special education and 10.5% elementary education PTs).
Some did not respond to the question (6.1% special education and 46.3% elementary education PTs), and others provided off-subject responses (10.4% special education and 22.2% elementary education PTs); a majority in both groups reported gains in understanding how to work with students with disabilities.