off (one's) back

off (one's) back

No longer a source of constant stress, anxiety, aggravation, or pressure. To be honest, it's a bit of relief having all that fame off my back. It just felt like I was under constant scrutiny no matter where I went or what I did. Would you get off my back? I'm going to mow the lawn after lunch.
See also: back, off
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

off someone's back

Also off someone's case. No longer harassing or bothering someone. It is often put as get off someone's back or case , as in I told her to get off my back-I'll mow the lawn tomorrow, or I wish Dad would get off my case about grades. The first of these slangy terms dates from the 1880s although it became frequent only in the 1940s, and its antonym, on one's back (as in He's been on my back about that report all morning) dates from about 1960. The variant off someone's case was first recorded only in 1970, and its antonym, on someone's case (as in He's always on my case) in 1971. Also see get off, def. 8.
See also: back, off
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

off (someone's) back

No longer nagging or urging someone to do something.
See also: back, off
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See also: