of yore


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days of yore

A time in the past or of a bygone era, especially one remembered nostalgically. Can be used ironically to mock such sentiment. In days of yore, people had to rely on their own hands for the food on their table, not the massively processed food we get from the supermarket nowadays. Many people long for a time gone past when societal roles were clearly defined. They fail to remember, though, that in such days of yore, horrible inequality was rife.
See also: days, of, yore

of yore

old-fashioned Of the ancient past; of long ago. In times of yore, before telephones and the Internet, we relied on our family and neighbors for nearly every aspect of our lives.
See also: of, yore

of ˈyore

(old use or literary) long ago: in days of yore
See also: of, yore

days of yore

Time past. “Days of yore” is an archaic phrase once used in historical narratives (e.g., describing tales of King Arthur and his Round Table) and now heard only – and very rarely—in a humorous context. “Yore” comes from the Middle English word for “year,” which echoes its archaism.
See also: days, of, yore
References in classic literature ?
But the raven still beguiling all my sad soul into smiling, Straight I wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird, and bust and door; Then, upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linking Fancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore -- What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt and ominous bird of yore Meant in croaking "Nevermore."
But the Raven still beguiling all my sad soul into smiling, Straight I wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird and bust and door; Then, upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linking Fancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore-- What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt, and ominous bird of yore Meant in croaking "Nevermore."
When we had conversed for a while, Miss Havisham sent us two out to walk in the neglected garden: on our coming in by-and-by, she said, I should wheel her about a little as in times of yore.
(Healer of Delos, hear!) Hast thou some pain unknown before, Or with the circling years renewest a penance of yore? Offspring of golden Hope, thou voice immortal, O tell me.
But the Milky Way, it seemed to me, was still the same tattered streamer of star-dust as of yore. Southward (as I judged it) was a very bright red star that was new to me; it was even more splendid than our own green Sirius.
- the dread of what will my neighbour think, with luxuries that only cloy, with pleasures that bore, with empty show that, like the criminal's iron crown of yore, makes to bleed and swoon the aching head that wears it!
He might have been a trifle graver than of yore, but the glint of laughter still was in his eyes.
Schoolwork was as interesting, class rivalry as absorbing, as of yore. New worlds of thought, feeling, and ambition, fresh, fascinating fields of unexplored knowledge seemed to be opening out before Anne's eager eyes.
Anne's laugh, as blithe and irresistible as of yore, with an added note of sweetness and maturity, rang through the garret.
A little older she looks; her form a little fuller; her air more matronly than of yore; but evidently contented and happy as woman need be.
Here haunted of yore the fabulous Dragon of Wantley; here were fought many of the most desperate battles during the Civil Wars of the Roses; and here also flourished in ancient times those bands of gallant outlaws, whose deeds have been rendered so popular in English song.
This year, couples are sending guests away with gifts they actually might want, rather than generic items of yore. According to Etsy, searches so far this year for such things as "wine favors," ''soap favors" and "honey favors" were on the rise.
"Call me Queen Canute but I'm pining for the cuddly Winnie the Pooh-esque gentlemen of yore, bushy chests and furry knees" - Broadcaster Vanessa Feltz.
According to a recent WIRED article, a medical training robot named Hal just made his debut in the classroom to replace the lifeless mannequins of yore. He's capable of shedding tears, bleeding, and urinating via a wireless control that can also cause him to go into anaphylactic shock or cardiac arrest.
Sending a child to their room no longer carries the threat of yore, when their room is now equipped with TV and laptop.