of that ilk


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of that ilk

1. Scottish archaic Of the same territory, estate, or location of that name. (Implies the person is a proprietor or from a land-owning family or lineage.) John Johnstone of that ilk, the last remaining man of that line, died of consumption at an early age.
2. Of that same or a certain type, class, or kind. It really surprises me that they would let men of that ilk into a respectable place like this.
See also: ilk, of, that

of that ilk

Of the same kind or class. The word ilk is now rarely used (except in Scotland) other than in this cliché, which is actually a twisting of the original meaning. It comes from the Old English ilca, meaning “the same,” and is correctly used only in referring to a person whose last name is the same as that of his estate; for example, Cawdor of that ilk means “Cawdor of Cawdor.”
See also: ilk, of, that
References in periodicals archive ?
The cock crowed again: "Cock a doodle doo." At that moment The Colonel appeared, recent egg on his chin, with Of That Ilk in close order:
There are still publishers of that ilk. Rob Steuteville, publisher of New Urban News, told NL/NL he can't imagine publishing on any other subject.
The biggest drain on the NHS and other government support agencies are the drug addicts, alcoholics and others of that ilk
Watt said: ``I think the alarming thing is we've been looking upon Scott as good as Barrer a and people of that ilk.
Teenage fans of Gossip Girl and other books of that ilk may gravitate toward it and may enjoy it, if they're in the mood for a book full of style but lacking any real substance.
Chances are, when you call Microsoft, Citibank, and anyone of that ilk, you actually are calling the Philippines or else India.
Fans of Cometbus and stuff of that ilk, would appreciate this.
Who reads People magazine and watches Hard Copy, Entertainment Tonight, and a host of titillating offerings of that ilk?
This book, which appeared originally as a long article in the William and Mary Bill of Rights Journal, is a well-documented (470 footnotes) refutation of the disinformation campaign being waged against church-state separation by televangelist and political operative Pat Robertson and others of that ilk.