of necessity


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Related to of necessity: contingence, out of necessity

of necessity

1. Literally, having to do with or relating to necessity. You don't seem to understand that the issues of necessity and pragmatism outweigh those idealism and desire.
2. Absolutely necessary; of the utmost importance. This is a matter of necessity for us—if we don't secure this investment, the company is as good as finished.
3. Necessarily; as an inevitable or unavoidable outcome or consequence. Of necessity, we are closing the factory for the week to allow investigators to conduct their examination.
See also: necessity, of

of necessity

Also, out of necessity. As an inevitable consequence, unavoidably, as in the New Testament: "Of necessity he must release one unto them at the Feast" (Luke 23:17). [Late 1300s]
See also: necessity, of

of necessity

As an inevitable consequence; necessarily.
See also: necessity, of
References in periodicals archive ?
The law of necessity was misapplied by the judges of the Supreme Court and those with a direct financial interest should, in all conscience, recuse themselves as individuals even at the eleventh hour.
Most states east of the Mississippi River require a party to demonstrate strict necessity to successfully claim an easement of necessity. E.g., Pencoder Assocs., Inc.
They are sick of echo chambers, and one by one they are deciding to resist the pull of necessity and embrace freedom.
(2) Statutory Way of Necessity Exclusive of Common-Law Right.
Recognizing the distinction between questions of whether destruction is permissible and whether compensation is owed for that destruction, and thus between the two different types of necessity relevant to each question, makes clear that the presence of one type of necessity does not automatically entail the presence of the other.
All age groups saw declines, or stagnancy, in their income growth rates and adjusted their consumption ratios of necessity to luxury goods.
In circumstances where necessity is at its most constraining (that is, human rights principles), the law might have taken the constraining power of necessity too far when applied to armed conflict (p 189).
at 717-19 (The dissent argues that the majority ignores the "core concerns" of the doctrine of necessity which include the "special importance of life and attempts to preserve it.").
(61) This holding is, in essence, an implicit adoption of necessity jurisdiction although the court relied on forum non conveniens cases like Spiliada Maritime Corp v Cansulex Ltd (62) and Connelly v RTZ Corpn Pic (No 2), (63) where the House of Lords decided on whether stay could be granted in favour of a forum where practical justice could not be done.
In the case of necessity, the Court has held that if an accused faced urgent circumstances of imminent peril, had no reasonable legal alternative, and the harm caused by the accused was proportional to the harm avoided, then the accused is entitled to a defence for committing an offence.
The study's findings suggest a strong case for more tailored national entrepreneurship policies in the Arab region which reflect the mix of necessity versus opportunity-driven entrepreneurs operating in particular countries.
Aristotle's Topics introduces a deductive argument as follows: "a deduction [sullogismos] is an account [logos] in which, some things being supposed, something other than that which is assumed results of necessity [ex anagkes sumbainei] in virtue of that which has been assumed." (1) The translation of sullogismos as "deduction," instead of "syllogism," is a matter for discussion, but the term "deduction" here exclusively pertains to Aristotle's conception of deduction in the same way as epagoge, translated as "induction," is confined to his view on induction.
Among the various restrictions on the legislative process found in the New York Constitution, (7) none has raised more controversy or received more attention than the provision authorizing the governor to issue a message of necessity to suspend the constitutional requirement that legislation be on the desks of legislators in final form at least three calendar days before final passage.