the man/woman/thing of (one's) dreams

(redirected from of dreams)

the man/woman/thing of (one's) dreams

The ideal person or thing that one has been hoping or longing for. When discussing a person, it refers to an ideal romantic partner. I never expected to get married again, but meeting the man of my dreams completely changed my mind. I can't turn down this offer—it's the job of my dreams!
See also: dream, man, of, thing, woman

the man

verb
See man
See also: man
References in classic literature ?
I had never seen blueberries before, and yet, at the sight of them, there leaped up in my mind memories of dreams wherein I had wandered through swampy land eating my fill of them.
Chaka the king is now a Doctor of Dreams, and to clear away such a dream as this he has a purging medicine."
First, that men mark when they hit, and never mark when they miss; as they do generally also of dreams. The second is, that probable conjectures, or obscure traditions, many times turn themselves into prophecies; while the nature of man, which coveteth divination, thinks it no peril to foretell that which indeed they do but collect.
I now began to reason that my situation was in the last degree serious, dream or no dream; for I knew by past experience of the lifelike intensity of dreams, that to be burned to death, even in a dream, would be very far from being a jest, and was a thing to be avoided, by any means, fair or foul, that I could contrive.
But some scientists contend that those kinds of dreams are ways in which the body is allowing you to practice the "fight or flight" response without actually being in real danger.
I have always looked at the role of the CEO or manager in a corporate entity and even at the role of the politician who holds the principal office of responsibility of the country as of a 'seller of dreams' and no more.
Poor dream recall or lack of dreams can be a risk factor for depression, and middle-aged people who act out dieir dreams may be at higher risk for Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.
Reading this book is a submersion in the land of dreams, one that may prompt readers to record their nightly journeys each morning.
Around 95 percent of dreams are forgotten by the time a person gets out of bed.
This book examines the science and analysis of dreams. The first part uses a question-and-answer format to discuss what is known about dreams from psychological research, from sleep labs to neuroscience, including research about the nature of dreaming, dreaming and the brain, dream recall, the sources and content of dreams, lucid dreaming, theories about dreams and recurring dreams, gender and age differences, bizarre dreams, dreams and mental illness, anxiety dreams, nightmares, night terrors, the positive effects of dreams on emotions and problem solving, and message and predictive dreams.
In "Llewellyn's Little Book of Dreams" he draws upon his years of experience and expertise to write pocket-sized guide to dreams and interpretation for improved understanding of our journey through life.
He developed methods or techniques to uncover or release them, but his pansexualistic theory of dreams did not go well with other psychologists, notably Carl Jung, and the two eventually parted ways.
Essentially a complete course of instruction with reference to the interpretation of dreams, "The Dream Interpretation Dictionary" will prove to be an enduringly popular addition to both community and academic library collections.
"Grand Legacy at the Park has been a supporter of Dreams almost since the beginning," says Dream Foundation's Chief Executive Officer, Kisa Heyer.
Kiran Toor says that Coleridge was "a sort of Sandman, a weaver of elusive 'Day-Dreams', 'Sorts of Dreams', 'Reveries', 'Visions in Dream', and 'Fragments from the life of Dreams.' What he might have been was one of the earliest dream analysts" (83).