of age


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of age

Being at the age of majority—that is, old enough by law to vote, marry, or sign legal agreements without one's parents. Typically refers to age 18, the age of majority in the United States. Just because you're of age doesn't mean you're suddenly versed in the ways of the world—you're still just a kid. Our parents don't approve of the marriage, but we're both of age now, so they can't stop us.
See also: age, of

*of age

old enough to marry, buy alcohol, or to sign legal agreements. (*Typically: be ~; Come ~.) Now that Mary is of age, she can buy her own car. When I'm of age, I'm going to get married and move to the city.
See also: age, of

of age

1. Old enough, according to the law, to be eligible for something, as in In this state he's not of age for buying liquor, but he may vote, or Next year Jane's coming of age and will get her driver's license. This usage was first recorded about 1430. The term under age signifies being too young to be eligible, as in It's against the law to serve alcohol to anyone under age.
2. come of age. Mature or develop fully, as in The school's bilingual program has finally come of age.
See also: age, of
References in periodicals archive ?
Doctors could use such a "biomarker of age," he says, to identify patients who are most or least likely to benefit from tests such as colonoscopy and treatments such as chemotherapy.
By extending previous methods to model age as a time-dependent covariate, I show here that the stable age distribution over time is in fact better explained by an influence of age on risk for disease after infection.
Nearly 5 million of the 32 million Americans 65 years of age or older have some form of depression.
This restructuring of work incentives, work options and benefits packages needed is found to benefit all workers regardless of age, disability, sex, and cultural background.
Traditionally, the State-Federal Vocational Rehabilitation program restricted service to those of working age, which was defined as 16-64 years of age (Bahcall & Berven, 1986).
com research shows employers are three-times more optimistic than employees about a decline of age bias in the future
44 events per 100,000 persons for every additional 10 years of age, the team reported.
Three decades ago most reported case-patients in Thailand were 3-6 years of age (1).
Like elderly people, who have wrinkles and other signs of age, "old worms have a particular look to them," Kenyon says.
Since family limitation was being practiced in Iowa, the expectation based on the schedule of natural fertility does not eliminate the effect of age.
com/reports/c49103) has announced the addition of Age Discrimination in Employment to their offering.
The state of age bias today is not unlike the issues of gender, racial and national origin bias over the past 30 years or more.
3) And what was the relationship between the hierarchies of age and social rank?
Help Not Always Wanted: In addition to the financial pressures, many aging workers face an additional barrier to workplace fulfillment: the perception of age bias.