of a morning/afternoon/evening

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of a morning/afternoon/evening

1. Very often at this time of day; on most occasions at this time of day. My father has a ritual of an evening, enjoying the newspaper with a measure of whiskey after dinner in front of the fire.
2. At some point at this time of day. There's a soccer club playing at the park if you're ever stuck for something to do of a morning in the summertime.
References in classic literature ?
Is there any human being, I wonder, besides the hero of a Sunday-school "tale for boys," who ever gets up willingly?
He made fine and accurate reproductions of a number of his "records," and then enlarged them on a scale of ten to one with his pantograph.
The patterns of a twin's right hand are not the same as those on his left.
He turned his back, and the two panes were quickly covered with delicately lined oval spots, but visible only to such persons as could get a dark background for them--the foliage of a tree, outside, for instance.
Then it was a splendid imitation of a pain," retorted Tip, angrily.
Having forgotten this gentleman's name, I must beg leave to distinguish him by means of a letter of the alphabet.
wife with the air of a man who felt unaffectedly ashamed of it:
Compatible with the will of a judge having jurisdiction.
which a word in the middle of a line rhymes with a word at the end, as
are so called in honor of a poet named Leo, whom prosodists appear to
Then all of a soodden, he sings oot for a loight, and when it cooms--ecod, such a hoorly-boorly
You were speaking about Miss Squeers,' said Nicholas, with the view of stopping some slight connubialities which had begun to pass between Mr and Mrs Browdie, and which rendered the position of a third party in some degree embarrassing, as occasioning him to feel rather in the way than otherwise.
But there being now an appearance of a temporary calm, in which the proceedings of little Wackford could scarcely fail to be observed, he feigned to be aware of the circumstance for the first time, and inflicted upon the face of that young gentleman a slap that made the very tea-cups ring.
Waterbrook to be a middle-aged gentleman, with a short throat, and a good deal of shirt-collar, who only wanted a black nose to be the portrait of a pug-dog.
It completely conveyed the idea of a man who had been born, not to say with a silver spoon, but with a scaling-ladder, and had gone on mounting all the heights of life one after another, until now he looked, from the top of the fortifications, with the eye of a philosopher and a patron, on the people down in the trenches.