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odd couple

A particularly unlikely or mismatched pair of people. Though the senator and her running mate are quite the odd couple on paper, the partnership is clearly intended to broaden the scope of her appeal to voters in the upcoming election. We're a bit of an odd couple, all right, but the differences between my girlfriend and I seem to balance each other out.
See also: couple, odd

odd duck

A rather unusual, strange, or peculiar person. His new girlfriend is nice enough, but she's a bit of an odd duck, don't you think?
See also: duck, odd

(the) odd one out

1. Someone who is excluded from or left out of a group for some reason. Ever since my injury, I've been odd one out when my friends go to play football together. John never really fit in with others. Even in elementary school, he was usually the odd one out.
2. Something or someone that is decidedly or markedly different, atypical, or unusual in comparison to others in a group. My clunky old truck is quite the odd one out next to all my coworkers' flashy new sports cars. You're going to be the odd one out if you go to a dinner party dressed like that!
See also: odd, one, out

odd and curious

Strange and intriguing. We've had some odd and curious findings ever since making that change to the experiment.
See also: and, odd

odd fish

Someone deemed strange by others. No, I didn't invite Joey—he's an odd fish, if you ask me. You can't say weird stuff like that, unless you want everyone else to think you're an odd fish.
See also: fish, odd

(the) odd man out

1. Someone who is excluded from or left out of a group for some reason. Ever since his injury, John has been odd man out when his friends go to play football together. I never really fit in with others. Even in elementary school I was usually the odd man out.
2. Something or someone that is decidedly or markedly different, atypical, or unusual in comparison to others in a group. My clunky old truck is quite the odd man out next to all my coworkers' new SUVs. You're going to be odd man out if you go to a dinner party dressed like that!
See also: man, odd, out

make odd bedfellows

Of a pair of people, things, or groups, to be connected in a certain situation or activity but to be extremely different in overall characteristics, opinions, ideologies, lifestyles, behaviors, etc. A notorious playboy musician and a buttoned-up media pundit may make odd bedfellows, but the two are coming together this month to bring a spotlight to suicide awareness. I thought that the two writers would make odd bedfellows for this class, given the drastically different nature of their writing, but their books actually have a lot of parallels in terms of themes and constructs.
See also: bedfellow, make, odd

keep (some kind of) hours

1. To maintain a particular pattern or schedule of being awake and asleep. Because of the huge time difference, Sam has kept really strange hours since coming back from Japan. It's important that the kids start keeping regular hours when they are young, since having unpredictable bedtimes can cause a lot of problems with sleep.
2. To maintain particular business hours. The local doctor has always kept rather irregular hours. Sometimes it just comes down to luck whether he'll be there at all on a given day.
See also: hour, keep, kind

odd job

A miscellaneous, nonspecialized job or task. My grandparents always had a few odd jobs for us to do around their house if we were ever looking to earn a bit of extra cash as kids. He's been earning a living as a handyman of sorts, doing odd jobs for people around town.
See also: job, odd

(the) best of (an odd number)

A victorious outcome determined by the person or team who wins the majority of an odd number of games (three, five, seven, etc.). I love the Stanley Cup Playoffs more than other sports championships because the fact that's it's the best of seven means a team can have an off day but still rally to win the whole thing. A: "Fancy playing a round of tennis." B: "Sure! Best of five?"
See also: odd, of

odds bodkins

antiquated A minced oath for "God's body," expressing surprise, shock, or astonishment. Odds bodkins, the bill for dinner is nearly $200!
See also: bodkin, odds

odd bedfellows

A pair of people, things, or groups connected in a certain situation or activity but extremely different in overall characteristics, opinions, ideologies, lifestyles, behaviors, etc. A notorious playboy musician and an ultra-conservative media pundit may be odd bedfellows, but the two are coming together all this month to bring a spotlight to suicide awareness. I thought that the two writers would make odd bedfellows, given the drastically different nature of their writing, but the books they've co-written actually work really well.
See also: bedfellow, odd

strange bedfellows

A pair of people, things, or groups connected in a certain situation or activity but extremely different in overall characteristics, opinions, ideologies, lifestyles, behaviors, etc. A notorious playboy musician and an ultra-conservative media pundit may be strange bedfellows, but the two are coming together all this month to bring a spotlight to suicide awareness. I thought that the two writers would make strange bedfellows, given the drastically different nature of their writing, but the books they've co-written actually work really well.
See also: bedfellow, strange

odd bird

A rather unusual, strange, eccentric, or peculiar person. His new girlfriend is nice enough, but she's a bit of an odd bird, don't you think?
See also: bird, odd

odd bod

1. noun A rather unusual, strange, eccentric, or peculiar person. His new girlfriend is nice enough, but she's a bit of an odd bod, don't you think? I'm still in disbelief someone like her would want to date an odd bod like me.
2. adjective Particularly unusual, strange, eccentric, or peculiar. Hyphenated and used before a noun. I don't mind if Jeff comes to the party, but I don't want those odd-bod friends he hangs around with to be there. She's something of an odd-bod artist, living in total solitude and rarely making public appearances.
See also: bod, odd

odd man out

an unusual or atypical person or thing. I'm odd man out because I'm not wearing a tie. You had better learn to use the new system software unless you want to be odd man out.
See also: man, odd, out

odd something

an extra or spare something; a chance something. The tailor repaired the odd loose button on my shirt. When I travel, I might buy the odd trinket or two, but I never spend much money.

odd couple

see under strange bedfellows.
See also: couple, odd

odd man out

1. A person who is left out of a group for some reason, as in The invitation was for couples only, so Jane was odd man out. [Mid-1800s]
2. Something or someone who differs markedly from the others in a group, as in Among all those ranch-style houses, their Victorian was odd man out. [Late 1800s]
See also: man, odd, out

strange bedfellows

A peculiar alliance or combination, as in George and Arthur really are strange bedfellows, sharing the same job but totally different in their views . Although strictly speaking bedfellows are persons who share a bed, like husband and wife, the term has been used figuratively since the late 1400s. This particular idiom may have been invented by Shakespeare in The Tempest (2:2), "Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows." Today a common extension is politics makes strange bedfellows, meaning that politicians form peculiar associations so as to win more votes. A similar term is odd couple, a pair who share either housing or a business but are very different in most ways. This term gained currency with Neil Simon's Broadway play The Odd Couple and, even more, with the motion picture (1968) and subsequent television series based on it, contrasting housemates Felix and Oscar, one meticulously neat and obsessively punctual, the other extremely messy and casual.
See also: bedfellow, strange

odd one (or man) out

1 someone or something that is different to the others. 2 someone who is not able to fit easily or comfortably into a group or society.
See also: odd, one, out

an ˌodd/a ˌqueer ˈfish

(old-fashioned, British English) a strange person: He’s an odd fish. He’s got a lot of very strange ideas.
See also: fish, odd, queer

ˌodd ˈjobs

various small, practical tasks, repairs, etc. in the home, often done for other people: I’ve got some odd jobs to do around the apartment; the bedroom door needs to be painted and the light fixed. ▶ ˌodd-ˈjob man noun (especially British English) a person who is employed to do odd jobs
See also: job, odd

the odd man/one ˈout

a person or thing that is different from others or does not fit easily into a group or set: That’s the problem with 13 people in a group. If you need to work in pairs, there’s always an odd one out.Tom is nearly always the odd man out. He never wants to do what we want to do, or go where we want to go.
See also: man, odd, one, out

odd bird

and strange bird
n. a strange or eccentric person. Mr. Wilson certainly is an odd bird. You’re a strange bird, but you’re fun.
See also: bird, odd

odd-bod

(ˈɑdbɑd)
1. n. a strange person. Who is that odd-bod over in the corner?
2. n. a person with a strange body. I am such an odd-bod that it’s hard to find clothes that fit.
3. n. a peculiar body. I have such an odd-bod that it’s hard to find clothes.

odd man out

One of a group who is not selected or included, or who differs markedly from the others. At first applied only to persons, the term later was extended also to inanimate objects, as in “This checkered tablecloth is odd man out in a formal dining room.”
See also: man, odd, out

strange bedfellows

An odd couple; a peculiar combination. Shakespeare appears to have originated the term, with his “Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows” (The Tempest, 2.2). Several centuries later, Edward Bulwer-Lytton wrote (The Caxtons, 1849), “Poverty has strange bedfellows.” Today we often say that politics makes strange bedfellows, meaning that politicians form odd associations in order to win more support or votes.
See also: bedfellow, strange

odd's bodkins

An archaic interjection meaning “God's body.” In an era where people respected the Ten Commandments a lot more than we do today, the injuncTion against taking the name of the Lord in vain led to a variety of euphemisms. One involved using the word “bodkins,” the tools that shoemakers and other leatherworkers use to pierce holes, for “body.” The most convincing explanation is that “bodkins” sounds a lot like “body,” but there's no explanation for the plural. Therefore, when a cobbler hit his thumb while resoling a shoe, he was likely to wince and exclaim, “Odd's bodkins,” if not something worse. Henry Fielding was the first author to use the phrase in close to its present form in his Don Quixote in England: “Odsbodlikins . . . you have a strange sort of a taste.” Similar oaths that avoided naming the diety used “'s” as an abbreviation of “God's,” such as “s'wounds,” “s'blood,” and “s'truth.” However, it's unlikely that Ira Gershwin had that in mind when he wrote the lyrics to “S'Wonderful.”
See also: bodkin
References in periodicals archive ?
It's odd to think it, even odder to write it, but I don't feel whole.
I consider it even odder given conservatives' environmental turn--their deep concern for America's moral climate being the best example.
Eric Johnson's departure couldn't have occurred at an odder time.
In one of the odder side effects of this country's move to democracy, a group of dedicated beer drinkers have formed their own party to run in Czechoslovakia's first free elections in 40 years.
Contract notice: offer for production and delivery of food service to odder municipality
But is it any odder than the idea of cable cars over Cardiff, a plan which is apparently being supported - with a straight face - by Nigel Roberts, head of Cardiff Business Council?
"Since the odder words, like Joey's 'reem', took off in popularity, a lot of the cast seem to have been using more of their own distinctive new words.
Even odder, at the club's golf day at Northcliffe, sponsor John Wildman holed his tee shot at the 12th - for a three!
The Tory policy on this issue however, is even odder.
It was an unlikely ambition to entertain in this most unlikely of settings, and one that saw Woodward driven by odder and odder compulsions - from hauling a 20-tonne railway carriage up the mountain to making hay with some hopelessly antiquated machinery.
Now Korean maker Kia has come up with an even odder use of the English language ( and invented a completely new word ( with the name chosen for its new five-door family hatchback.
Dear Editor, - The recent Cabinet reshuffle looks odder by the day.
Even odder was the financial section, where two pages assessed Britain's passion for punting.
Jones' Superlatives USA: The Largest, Smallest, Longest, Shortest, And Wackiest Sites In America (1931868859, $16.95) is a travel book of another type: a survey of odder destinations organized in a state-by-state arrangement for easy consultation.
The jobs get a lot odder when the daughter decides to take matters into her own hands and advertise her "personal services" on the Internet.