occur to

occur to (one)

To realize suddenly; to come into one's mind. It occurs to me that I never explained why we need these extra computers. Did it ever occur to you that maybe I was trying to do you a favor?
See also: occur

occur to someone

[for an idea or thought] to come into someone's mind. It occurred to me that you might be hungry after your long journey. Would it ever occur to you that I want to be left alone?
See also: occur

occur to

v.
To come to someone's mind: When it occurred to me that I could leave the party whenever I wanted, I felt more at ease.
See also: occur
References in classic literature ?
It did occur to Dunsey that it might be wise for him to give up the day's hunting, proceed at once to Batherley, and, having waited for Bryce's return, hire a horse to carry him home with the money in his pocket.
For the plan grows under the author's hand; new thoughts occur to him in the act of writing; he has not worked out the argument to the end before he begins.
Emma saw him only once; but two or three times every day Harriet was sure just to meet with him, or just to miss him, just to hear his voice, or see his shoulder, just to have something occur to preserve him in her fancy, in all the favouring warmth of surprize and conjecture.
It will readily occur to the antiquary, that these verses are intended to imitate the antique poetry of the Scalds the minstrels of the old Scandinavians the race, as the Laureate so happily terms them,
Sir Dinadan was so proud of his exploit that he could not keep from telling over and over again, to weariness, how the immortal idea happened to occur to him; and as is the way with humorists of his breed, he was still laughing at it after everybody else had got through.
He asked them why they were so dull -- why didn't it occur to them to strip me.
It is no wonder, therefore, that in circumstances which would have warranted a much more romantic and wild undertaking, it should occur to him to serve as a volunteer in this expedition.
In the fleeting instant of his vision his imagination had been so wrought upon by the apparent grace and ease and intention of the marvelous performance that it did not occur to him that the line of march of aerial cavalry is directly downward, and that he could find the objects of his search at the very foot of the cliff.
However, departments do not have to wait for these potential mandates to occur to begin reaping the benefits of this valuable practice.