occasion

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a sense of occasion

A feeling of ceremony, fanfare, or pomp and circumstance (about a certain event or situation). She laid out the nice table cloth and dinner settings, lit candles, and had classical music playing to give the dinner a real sense of occasion. You don't have to hire a band and have fireworks, but I'd like some sense of occasion for my last day in the office.
See also: occasion, of, sense

auspicious occasion

A celebratory or momentous event, situation, or circumstance. (Note that the meaning of auspicious here is slightly altered from its standard definition of favorable or timely.) We would like to invite you to the auspicious occasion of the marriage of our son, Luke, to his bride-to-be, Sophia. It was an auspicious occasion in the city, as people poured onto the streets to celebrate the queen's ascent to the throne.
See also: occasion

equal to the occasion

Having the necessary ability, talent, qualities, or capability to handle or accomplish a given role or situation. The young soldier proved equal to the occasion and saved his platoon from an enemy ambush. We need a manager who can lead project initiatives and efficiently direct employees—do you think you're equal to the occasion?
See also: equal, occasion

have occasion to (do something)

To have a reason, requirement, or motivation to do something. Now that I work closer to home, I don't have occasion to go to that side of town very often.
See also: have, occasion

keep (something) for another time/day/week/etc.

To reserve or save something for some future point or event. I'm sorry we didn't get a chance to do the hang-gliding—I guess we'll just have to keep it for another day. Don't throw those decorations out! We can keep them for another occasion down the line!
See also: another, keep, time, week

leave (something) for another time/day/week/etc.

To reserve or save something for some future point or event. I'm sorry we didn't get a chance to do the hang-gliding—I guess we'll just have to leave it for another day. Don't throw those decorations out! We can leave them for another occasion down the line!
See also: another, leave, time, week

on occasion

Once in a while; occasionally. I don't really drink, but I do enjoy a nice glass of wine with a meal on occasion.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the occasion

To increase one's effort in response to a challenging situation. If you're going to lead this team, you've got to rise to the occasion and start motivating them. It was a tough act to follow, but the band rose to the occasion and played the best set of their career.
See also: occasion, rise

save (something) for another time/day/week/etc.

To reserve or save something for some future point or event. I'm sorry we didn't get a chance to do the hang-gliding—I guess we'll just have to save it for another day. Don't throw those decorations out! We can save them for another occasion down the line!
See also: another, save, time, week

take the occasion (to do something)

To capitalize on or make practical and worthwhile use of a particular event, situation, happening, or opportunity in order to accomplish something. While I have everyone here, I just wanted to take the occasion to thank you all for your support on this journey—it's been truly humbling, from beginning to end. I know you're discouraged about having to look for a new job, but take the occasion to consider different areas of work that you might be interested in.
See also: occasion, take

leave something for another occasion

 and keep something for another occasion
to hold something back for later. (Occasion can be replaced with time, day, person, etc.) Please leave some cake for another day. Don't eat all the cheese. Leave some for another occasion. I have to leave some of my earnings for next month.
See also: another, leave, occasion

on occasion

occasionally. I like to go to the movies on occasion. On occasion, Mary would walk her dog through the park.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the occasion

Fig. to meet the challenge of an event; to try extra hard to do a task. John was able to rise to the occasion and make the conference a success. It was a big challenge, but he rose to the occasion.
See also: occasion, rise

on occasion

From time to time, now and then, as in Nell has been known to eat meat on occasion. This usage, first in the form of upon occasion, replaced by occasion about 1600.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the occasion

Show unexpected skill in dealing with a difficulty that arises, as in The leading man broke his leg in the first act but his understudy rose to the occasion and was rewarded with excellent reviews . [Mid-1800s]
See also: occasion, rise

rise to the occasion

perform better than usual in response to a special situation or event.
See also: occasion, rise

have occasion to do something

(formal) have a reason or need to do something: If you ever have occasion to visit Zurich, you will always be welcome to stay with us.
See also: have, occasion, something

on ocˈcasion(s)

sometimes; not very often: I don’t smoke cigarettes but I like to smoke a cigar on occasion.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the ocˈcasion/ˈchallenge

do something successfully in a difficult situation, emergency, etc: When the lead singer became ill, Cathy had to take her place. Everyone thought she rose to the occasion magnificently.This company must be prepared to rise to the challenge of a rapidly changing market.
See also: challenge, occasion, rise

a sense of ocˈcasion

a feeling or an understanding that an event is important or special: Candles on the table gave the evening a sense of occasion.
See also: occasion, of, sense

on occasion

From time to time; now and then.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the occasion

To find the ability to deal with an unexpected challenge.
See also: occasion, rise

take the occasion

To make use of the opportunity (to do something).
See also: occasion, take
References in classic literature ?
A second point is that, when we recognize something, it was not in fact the very same thing, but only something similar, that we experienced on a former occasion. Suppose the object in question is a friend's face.
Let us take a view of the converse of the proposition: "the Senate would influence the Executive." As I have had occasion to remark in several other instances, the indistinctness of the objection forbids a precise answer.
The private attachments of one man might easily be satisfied; but to satisfy the private attachments of a dozen, or of twenty men, would occasion a monopoly of all the principal employments of the government in a few families, and would lead more directly to an aristocracy or an oligarchy than any measure that could be contrived.
Occasionally, he shot himself out of his equipage head-foremost over the apron; and I saw him on one occasion deliver himself at the door of the Grove in this unintentional way - like coals.
As we got more and more into debt breakfast became a hollower and hollower form, and, being on one occasion at breakfast-time threatened (by letter) with legal proceedings, "not unwholly unconnected," as my local paper might put it, "with jewellery," I went so far as to seize the Avenger by his blue collar and shake him off his feet - so that he was actually in the air, like a booted Cupid - for presuming to suppose that we wanted a roll.
There was the engaging Young Barnacle, deriving from the sprightly side of the family, also from the Circumlocution Office, gaily and agreeably helping the occasion along, and treating it, in his sparkling way, as one of the official forms and fees of the Church Department of How not to do it.
Then the Barnacles felt that they for their parts would have done with the Meagleses when the present patronising occasion was over; and the Meagleses felt the same for their parts.
My magazine of powder and arms which I brought them was such, even to profusion, that they could not but rejoice at them; for now they could march as I used to do, with a musket upon each shoulder, if there was occasion; and were able to fight a thousand savages, if they had but some little advantages of situation, which also they could not miss, if they had occasion.
Thus he had been disappointed in five voyages; all, as I may call it, in one voyage, besides what I shall have occasion to mention further of him.
"On the drunken occasion in question (one of a large number, as you know), I was insufferable about liking you, and not liking you.
Drake looked in, and instructed her on this occasion, for the first time, to lay the table for two persons.
"NOW, sir, do you believe in ROBINSON CRUSOE?" I asked, with a solemnity, suitable to the occasion.
And here, whenever I had occasion to be absent from my chief seat, I took up my country habitation.
I slept none that night; the farther I was from the occasion of my fright, the greater my apprehensions were, which is something contrary to the nature of such things, and especially to the usual practice of all creatures in fear; but I was so embarrassed with my own frightful ideas of the thing, that I formed nothing but dismal imaginations to myself, even though I was now a great way off.
When we reached the rock that abruptly terminated the path, and concealed from us the festive scene, wild shouts and a confused blending of voices assured me that the occasion, whatever it might be, had drawn together a great multitude.