oblige


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much obliged

1. Indebted to someone for their generosity, kindness, or favor. We are much obliged for all you have done on behalf of our father.
2. Thank you very much. A: "Here's your jacket, sir." B: "Much obliged, son."
See also: much, oblige

noblesse obligé

Altruistic, honorable behavior or deeds that are an assumed responsibility of people of nobility or, more broadly, economic privilege. Taken from French, literally meaning "nobility obligates." The president of the tech megacorporation seems fixated on noblesse obligé these days, seemingly spending more time doing volunteer and charity work than actually running his own company.
See also: oblige

oblige (one) by (doing something)

To make one indebted by doing something for them or on their behalf; to do something that accommodates one. You're under no circumstances required to oblige your employers by giving up your legal rights in this case. I was wondering if you would oblige me by picking up a parcel for me from the post office.
See also: by, oblige

oblige (one) to (do something)

To compel, bind, or otherwise force one to do something out of a moral or legal obligation. You cannot oblige your employees to put themselves in harm's way. It's simply not the case that pregnancy obliges a couple to get married any longer.
See also: oblige

oblige (one) with (something)

To grace, accommodate, or provide one with some service or favor. The famous movie star was always happy to oblige his fans with autographs and pictures. Go on, Auntie May, oblige us with a story!
See also: oblige

Much obliged.

Rur. Thankful and owing a debt of gratitude. A: Sit down, Elmer, and have a drink on me. B: Much obliged.
See also: much, oblige

oblige someone by something

to accommodate someone by doing something. Please oblige me by closing the window. Would you oblige me by accompanying me to the dance?
See also: by, oblige

oblige someone to do something

to require someone to do something. You are obliged to arrive on time and enter by the side door. The lateness of the hour obliged Tony to enter by the back door.
See also: oblige

oblige someone with something

to accommodate someone with something. He obliged her with a willing attitude. Please oblige me with a big piece of cake.
See also: oblige

noblesse oblige

privilege entails responsibility.
See also: oblige
References in periodicals archive ?
Although a 2006 law on depositor protection obliges banks to reimburse depositors in the event of savings being withdrawn with stolen cash cards, it does not provide protection in cases where savings are illicitly pulled out via the Net or with stolen bankbooks.
The FSA, the nation's financial industry watchdog, will oblige insurers to supply in their financial statements more information on the financial and business conditions of debtors when reporting on bad loans.
"The current regulation that obliges people to use light colours will continue, but people will not be obliged to go for the lightest, they could easily paint with medium-light colours.
In a press statement, Mayahi stated that "the news we receive from Syria oblige us to feel worried, but we are astonished to the role of UN observers there".
The Yomiuri Shimbun reported Sunday that the ruling Liberal Democratic Party is considering enacting a new law that would oblige LTCB to use cash resources in its capital accounts to write off bad loans, as a prerequisite for receiving public funds.
"He would go to endless lengths to oblige you and anything he did, he did well.
But it's possible she'll be happy to oblige, not least because you are clearly happy to oblige her.
Legal experts have demanded the creation of a commission that obliges government bodies to implement the rulings.
The bill also obliges the Rwandan Government "to suspend fertility for mentally handicapped people".
The government will soon issue a regulation that obliges local tire producers to meet the Indonesian National Standard (SNI).
If they fail to agree, the legislation has a fall-back position which obliges the employer to tell staff about the company's "activities and economic situation", and consult them on employment issues and "major changes in work organisation or contractual relations."