oater


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oater

A film or theatrical production about the American West (i.e., a Western), especially one that is clichéd or formulaic. My grandfather and I had a tradition of watching old oaters every Sunday on TV.

oater

(ˈodɚ)
n. a Western movie. (see also horse opera.) Let’s go out and see a good old-fashioned oater.
References in periodicals archive ?
So there's a certain karmic beauty in the fact that sci-fi should be the reason to dust off the oater, if only just this once.
In a typical example, a cowboy's flashy behind-the-back move echoes a piece of gunplay familiar from countless oaters, but his tools are brushes, not Colts; he is a cowboy painter, who works this way, he explains, "in order to release myself from the pedestrian constraints of mere representation.
While somewhat long, interest is sustained and net effect is one of the better class oaters of the year.
Probably the worst 1950s movie that gets mistaken for a great Western, "3:10 to Yuma" truly made such other self-important "meaningful" oaters as "High Noon" and "Shane" look hard-bitten and exciting.
4) Jane and Michael Stern, "Why We So Love Those Oaters," The Los Angeles Times Calendar, 5 December 1993, 28.
Granted, History has enjoyed considerable success with oaters in this particular window--witness the breakout ratings for "Hatfields & McCoys" in 2012--and one suspects "Texas Rising" could capitalize on a similar dynamic, albeit in a less-ostentatious way.
Though Wayne had been in Hollywood for a number of years before making oaters, it was his role as the Ringo Kid in ``Stagecoach'' that made him a star.
With oaters on the brink of extinction, Jones offers hope.
Up until then, oaters had pretty much been Saturday matinee shoot-'em-up affairs.
The reason that Mann's Westerns continue to draw admiration today was that the director added a psychological layer that most oaters of the time avoided.
In Student and Villegas, Lamothe demonstrated the calm gait and emotional containment of heroes from cinema's classic oaters.
Tarantino freely quotes from his favorite stylistic sources, whether oaters or otherwise, featuring lightning-quick zooms, an insert of unpicked cotton drenched in blood and a shot of Django riding into town framed through a hangman's noose.
Another showcase--Mexico/USA: The Frontier of Western--examines Mexico as seen in oaters.