oar

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Related to oared: plunder

stick (one's) oar in(to) (something)

1. To offer or express one's opinion (on some matter), even though it was not asked for or desired. Primarily heard in UK. I don't know why you feel you have to stick your oar into every dispute Terry and I are having. The members of the board are perfectly capable of arriving at a decision of their own accord, so I'll thank you for not sticking your oar in, Tom.
2. To involve oneself in an intrusive or nosy manner into something that is not one's business or responsibility. Primarily heard in UK. I wish my neighbors would quit sticking their oars in and just leave us alone! Liam, don't stick your oar into your brother's affairs—he can manage well enough on his own.
See also: oar, stick

rest on (one's) oars

To relax after achieving a goal or doing a physically strenuous activity (such as rowing, as the phrase suggests). I know you're happy to have won the election, but you can't just rest on your oars—you need to start planning your first act as class president now. After painting all morning, I had to rest on my oars for a bit before I moved on to the next room.
See also: oar, on, rest

put (one's) oar in(to) (something)

1. To offer or express one's opinion (on some matter), even though it was not asked for or desired. I don't know why you feel you have to put your oar into every dispute Terry and I are having. The members of the board are perfectly capable of arriving at a decision of their own accord, so I'll thank you for not putting your oar in, Tom.
2. To involve oneself in an intrusive or nosy manner into something that is not one's business or responsibility. I wish my neighbors would quit putting their oars in and just leave us alone! Liam, don't put your oar into your brother's affairs—he can manage well enough on his own.
See also: oar, put

have just one oar in the water

Rur. to not be thinking clearly. Tom has some crazy plan for opening his own restaurant. If you ask me, he has just one oar in the water. She has just one oar in the water if she thinks Bill is going to pay any attention to her.
See also: have, just, oar, one, water

put one's oar in

 and stick one's oar in; put one's two cents(' worth) in
Fig. to add one's comments or opinion, even if unwanted or unasked for. You don't need to put your oar in. I don't need your advice. I'm sorry. I shouldn't have stuck my oar in when you were arguing with your wife. Do you mind if I put in my oar? I have a suggestion. There is no need for you to put in your two cents' worth.
See also: oar, put

put one's oar in

Interfere with something or insert one's opinion, as in I'll thank you not to put your oar in when we're discussing a private matter. This term, referring to helping to row a boat, was first recorded in Charles Coffey's 1731 play The Devil to Pay: "I will govern my own house without your putting in an oar."
See also: oar, put

put your oar in (something)

or

stick your oar in (something)

mainly BRITISH, INFORMAL
If someone puts their oar in or sticks their oar in, they interfere in a situation or an argument. He let them say what they wanted to say without feeling the need to put his oar in; he is obviously a good listener. He should try to sort out his own affairs instead of sticking his oar in other people's business. Note: This comes from an old expression `to have an oar in every man's boat', meaning to interfere in other people's business.
See also: oar, put

rest on your oars

or

lean on your oars

BRITISH, OLD-FASHIONED
If a person or organization rests on their oars or leans on their oars, they do not work hard enough to make sure that they remain successful or get things done. The company has been resting on its oars and its competitors are catching up. Firms often take their time over making necessary changes, leaning on their oars while another study is done and another year goes by.
See also: oar, on, rest

keep both oars in the water

maintain a calm equilibrium in your life and affairs.
See also: both, keep, oar, water

rest on your oars

1 cease rowing by leaning on the handles of your oars, thereby lifting them horizontally out of the water. 2 relax your efforts.
A US variant of this phrase is lay on your oars .
See also: oar, on, rest

stick (or poke or put or shove) your oar in

give an opinion or advice without being asked. informal
1992 Daily Telegraph My only minor fault is I sometimes like putting my oar in…and my advice can be a little brutal.
See also: oar, stick

put/stick your ˈoar in

(British English, informal) interfere in the affairs of other people: This project is nothing to do with Dave. Why does he keep trying to stick his oar in all the time?
See also: oar, put, stick